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Blaine Bateman

Will Quantum Computing Enhance Analog Design? Part 1

Blaine Bateman
amrutah
amrutah
6/4/2013 2:27:34 PM
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Re: Re : Will Quantum Computing Enhance Analog Design? Part 1
RedDerek,

  I think it should take very less time for the simulation, not sure whether it would be in minutes.

In some tests it speed was found to be 3600 times a super computer, (yes a super computer), and for few tests it was 55000 times faster than the super computer.

You may want to check this.

Instead of using the binary  bits  0 and 1, it has 512 quantum bits, or qubits for interaction and decision making.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
6/3/2013 2:37:41 AM
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Re: Re : Will Quantum Computing Enhance Analog Design? Part 1
Hi RedDerek--I think your question will be answered, at least in part, in Part 2.

The detailed answer depends on the exact problem type.  I think (but am not 100% sure) that problems of the type "Here is an analog system (say, power supply) that has these ranges of values for inputs and various components.  What is the optimum value for component x?" may be well suited to quantum computers becuase in principle a quantum computer could look at all the ranges of the inputs simultaneously (if there are enough qubits) and thus should be very fast at this type of optimizaton.

If you have more questions after part 2 we will go into it deeper.

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RedDerek
RedDerek
6/2/2013 7:53:07 PM
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Re: Re : Will Quantum Computing Enhance Analog Design? Part 1
From my perspective, I would just ask, what would the simulation speed enhancement would be for a power supply design simulation? If my current simulation can take 12 to 16 hours, would Quantum computing allow me to run the same simulation in 12 to 16 minutes? Then being able to share processor time on the cloud would get us back to the data centers of the 1980's where one was charged for the processor time to run one's program.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
6/1/2013 6:51:49 PM
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Re: Re : Will Quantum Computing Enhance Analog Design? Part 1
Hi DaeJ:  Well, IBM and many universities and research groups are working on various aspects of quantum computing.  Intel, however says they are not doing so yet.  You might be interested in this article (free registration required):

Seeking Alpha Quantum Computing and Intel

I don't agree with your characterization of D-Wave.  They are a small company with venture capital funding.  Due to the specialized nature of Quantum Computers, very few labs could even use one, so it is natural to expect the first customers to be government or university labs.  D-Wave sold an early D-Wave 1 to Lochkeed Martin who is using it to study various areas, including how to analyze complex systems like aircraft during the design phase. 

As noted in my blog, D-Wave just sold a D-Wave 2 to the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory which is funded by Google, uses space donated by NASA, and will be operated by the Universities Space Research Assocation (USRA).  Some of the time will be monopolized by Google and USRA, the rest will be offered to reserach groups.  So it is a combination of private and public but the funding is definitely not government.  It makes perfect sense that Google would want to be at the forefront of Quantum computing; eventually quantum computers might make computer speech recognition and response very human, they might improve search in large databases, and many other things of direct interest to Google.

You are correct that cost is a big barrier, but in the near future there won't be too many quantum computers and even when more commercialized, it is likely they may operate in the cloud and there will be no need to "put one on a desktop".  Google of course is at the leading edge of cloud computing with their Chromebooks.  Just imagine if the cloud had quantum capability what a Chromebook might be able to do.

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DaeJ
DaeJ
6/1/2013 2:31:59 PM
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Re: Re : Will Quantum Computing Enhance Analog Design? Part 1
I thought that Quantum Computing has been developed and researched for a while in the IBM, HP, Intel and etc. D Wave is specialized for a specific customer such as Government.  To commercialize the product in public, cost will be one of main factor in the market.  There is no doubt that in theory, quantum computing is awesome.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
5/31/2013 7:36:36 PM
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Re: Re : Will Quantum Computing Enhance Analog Design? Part 1
Hi Sunita--thanks for reading the blog.  I think you will find Part II interesting.  

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SunitaT0
SunitaT0
5/31/2013 7:23:18 PM
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Re : Will Quantum Computing Enhance Analog Design? Part 1
@Blaine, thanks for the post. Quantum computing promises faster solution to some problems. Already some commercial versions of Quantum computers (D-Wave) is available in the market. Looking forward for your next blog to learn more about quantum computing.

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