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Maxim Integrated - Integration Nation
Blaine Bateman

Can We Use Analog Circuits for Cryptography?

Blaine Bateman
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Navelpluis
Navelpluis
12/20/2013 3:50:41 AM
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Artist
Re: Side Channel Attack
For all engineers new on the cryptology topic: It is wise to know and respect the old stuff first, the same as with measuring equipment ;-)

Look here: http://www.cryptomuseum.com/crypto/index.htm

I am sure a couple of folks around here will have a great X-mas due to these pages ;-)

Have fun,

Navelpluis

 

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Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
12/19/2013 4:51:27 PM
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Re: Side Channel Attack
You're wellcome, @etnapowers.

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etnapowers
etnapowers
12/19/2013 4:32:59 PM
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Master
Re: Side Channel Attack
@Victor: thank you very much for the details that you provided, I have read in the TRF7970A's support page that the Analog front end supports the Near Field Communication (NFC) Standards NFCIP-1 (ISO/IEC 18092) and NFCIP 2 (ISO/IEC 21481).

It's very interesting to me.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
12/18/2013 2:36:19 PM
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Re: Side Channel Attack
Hi Victor--your point is quite valid.  I have heard of ones using the home WiFi to allow the owner to control the lock while away via the internet.  That gives me worries 2x over--hacking the communication over the internet and gaining the accss information for the door lock, and/or hacking the WiFi router which is relatively easy in many cases.

On the other hand the RFID type solution is very solid and has been used in industrial buildings etc., but it is not straightforward to take that and provide internet access without opening up again.  

So my point was really about the IoT concept where everything has an IP address; the other more localized technologies are quite mature.

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Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
12/18/2013 9:01:53 AM
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Re: Side Channel Attack
@etnapowers, "(...)is there any link available that deals such an application?"

The information is a little bit disperse as it covers many aspects.

In TI's e2e forum (http://e2e.ti.com/support/low_power_rf/f/667.aspx) several threads cover the topics about card emulation (CE) using TI's TRF7970A NFC reader chip, some posts include archives with sample CE code.

You might want to take a look at TRF7970A's support page, specially to the Design Kits and Evaluation Modules section and the NFCLINK firmware in the Software section. I used the sample code and sample SPI captures provided by one TI engineer only as reference as in our case we developed our own hardware with a more powerfull CPU.

There's a book named "Protocols for authentication and key establishment" that lists a number of protocols for implementing the two way authentication as well as the session key derivation, but for one conceptually simple two way authentication procedure implementation you could take a look at the MIFARE DESFire authentication protocol.

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etnapowers
etnapowers
12/18/2013 8:23:20 AM
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Re: Side Channel Attack
@Victor: I agree with you on your sentence: "If the RF field is confined to a few centimeters (at most 3-to-7cm) it will be very difficult to sniff into the communication at a distant point."

That's right to me, but some white noise generator utilized to interfer with the signal could be used despite of it is generated in a quite distant point.

The application NFC based sounds very interesting, is there any link available that deals such an application?

 

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etnapowers
etnapowers
12/18/2013 8:13:20 AM
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Master
Re: Side Channel Attack
Hi Blaine, I think that the National Security Agency will use this only for security purpose, and this is good, thank you for your link, it's really interesting, in particular I want to report a sentence of this article:

"The agency's ability to crack encryption used by the majority of cellphones in the world offers it wide-ranging powers to listen in on private conversations."

 

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Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
12/16/2013 11:03:06 AM
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Re: Side Channel Attack
@eafpres, "NSA cracks commonly used cell phone security"

Perhaps not only NSA, there has been 'some' activity on breaking the GSM security protocols: http://domonkos.tomcsanyi.net/?p=418

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Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
12/16/2013 10:54:05 AM
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Re: Side Channel Attack
@etnapowers, "the presence of a  front door lock that can be opened by a smartphone could be utilized by the  thieves to intercept the signal if a proper level of security is not guaranteed"

I agree with you on that.

Depending on the air interface used for the key/lock communication it will make it more easier, or more difficult ;), for the attacker to compromise the access security. If the RF field is confined to a few centimeters (at most 3-to-7cm) it will be very difficult to sniff into the communication at a distant point.

It is not too difficult to create a very strong multi-pass authentication/encryption application for securing the door lock using the Android phone NFC APIs as the key, an NFC reader chip (TRF7970A) and some solenoide driver.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
12/16/2013 9:49:27 AM
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Re: Side Channel Attack
@etnapowers--and for those who think cell phone communication is more secure than, say, WiFi, read this article:

 

NSA cracks commonly used cell phone security

 

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Page 1 / 3   >   >>
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