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Aubrey Kagan

Excel-Optimizing Resistor Ratios, Part 2

Aubrey Kagan
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amrutah
amrutah
6/30/2014 8:55:45 PM
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Master
Re: Future blog subject
@SachinEE: "But if the mathematical formula is too complex then its better to implement it using macros..."

  I agree with you that the regularly needed equations can be automated by writing macros, if its one time use then no purpose is served.  But writing macros itself  needs a lot of testing.  There are a set of regularly used macros bundled and available in web, check for "ASAP Utilities" on Google.

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SachinEE
SachinEE
6/30/2014 7:31:47 PM
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Newbie
Re: Future blog subject
I am sure it can be used. Anything that can be expressed as a mathematical formual can be calculated- building a logical model- that is something else.


@antedeluvian, I totally agree with you. But if the mathematical formula is too complex then its better to implement it using macros because writing bigger formula is not easy.

 

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SachinEE
SachinEE
6/30/2014 7:16:29 PM
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Newbie
Re: Future blog subject
I think your next series of blogs can be based on MATLAB.

@tzubair, I totally agree with you. Tutorial on MATLAB will help both students and professionals. I really hope to see Matlab tutorials in future blogs.


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SachinEE
SachinEE
6/30/2014 7:12:51 PM
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Newbie
Re: Future blog subject
I do not wish to undermine the importance of Excel. It's as powerful a tool as any other.

@tzubair, I totally agree with you. Excel is very powerful tool and people have used excel to build very complex models. But only drawback of excel is if the data-points becomes very huge then its becomes pretty slow.


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SachinEE
SachinEE
6/30/2014 7:09:53 PM
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Newbie
Re : Excel-Optimizing Resistor Ratios, Part 2
I have now completed the series on Excel that I set out to write nearly two years ago.

@Aubrey, thanks a lot for the series on excel. We learnt a lot about excel and its application in calculation circuit variables. If possible can you post some blogs on how best we can use to calculate statistical parameters in excel.


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RedDerek
RedDerek
6/26/2014 8:14:38 PM
User Rank
Master
Part 1 reference
@Aubrey - check my comment in the part 1 of this set for I provided a link to my resistor calculator page that I have been using for some time. It might provide some other alternatives to your method.

I actually use formulas to calculate variations and work with the closest 1% set of resistors possible.

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tzubair
tzubair
6/25/2014 8:31:30 AM
User Rank
Newbie
Re: Future blog subject
@Aubrey: I think your next series of blogs can be based on MATLAB. In my academic and professional experience, I have mostly used MATLAB and that seems to be the norm for most engineers. I think that may be of great help to the current students and professionals as well as those aspiring to be one. However, I do not wish to undermine the importance of Excel. It's as powerful a tool as any other.

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tzubair
tzubair
6/25/2014 8:12:40 AM
User Rank
Newbie
Useful feature
Interesting post as always, Aubrey. Reading your blog has helped me refresh my Excel skills. I remember using the combination of data tables to generate a series of values and then using conditional formatting for a regression model that I was working on for an academic project. I guess Excel has a lot to offer to engineers but it's mostly the business professionals who tend to have more expertise in Excel than engineers.

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antedeluvian
antedeluvian
6/23/2014 2:36:13 AM
User Rank
Blogger
Statistics
I often wonder how many read my blogs and whether the effort is worth it. Many times I put quite a few hours into it and there are precious few comments as you can see in this case. To help me decide whether I should continue I put a counter on the download in this blog.

Here are the results:

There were a total of 141 downloads (there may be duplicates of course) from these places:

United States 68

Canada 12

United Kingdom 10

Germany 6

Australia 5

France 4

Italy 4

Hong Kong 3

Brazil 3

New Zealand 3

Taiwan 2

India 2

Spain 2

Israel 2

Sweden 2

Belgium 1

Denmark 1

Finland 1

Russian Federation 1

Netherlands 1

Portugal 1

Norway 1

South Africa 1

Argentina 1

European Union 1

Korea, Republic of 1

Singapore 1

Austria 1

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antedeluvian
antedeluvian
6/21/2014 3:05:00 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Future blog subject
Hi JK

Is it possible to use excel to design inductors?

I am sure it can be used. Anything that can be expressed as a mathematical formual can be calculated- building a logical model- that is something else. I believe Ridley Engineering have an inductor (for SMPS) design package that is rooted in Excel (but I could be wrong).


I know it is a daunting task, still, would like you to consider writing some blogs on this subject.


step 1. Learn about inductors.

Don't hold your breath! Actually I am planning a blog that will detail the design of a custom transformer as part of a AC Current Generator (reprising the design that appeared innCircuit Cellar Online many years ago). but there is no excel.

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Page 1 / 2   >   >>
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