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Brad Albing

Analog Design Techniques: Past, Present, & Future

Brad Albing
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/25/2013 12:32:07 PM
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Re: analog design techniques
And just one more comment on wire-wrapping. We used IC sockets (these were the days when ICs were in DIPs) with wire-wrap tales of course. And we generally used the same sockets with a header plugged into it onto which we could solder resistors, capacitors, diodes, and transistors. One of the cool tricks we could do if we needed to add a resistor or capacitor somewhere in the ckt where no spare position on a socket/header was located was to just poke the component leads (all thru-hole parts in those days) thru the perf-board that everything was built on. Then use the electric wire-wrap gun and wrap a wire onto its leads. And usually just a tiny bit of solder to make sure, since the component leads were not square.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/25/2013 10:13:51 AM
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Re: analog design techniques
And even tho' we got away with prototyping our analog cktry 30 or 40 years ago (and it worked), I wouldn't try it now - with our very wide bandwidth parts, the ckts would be ringing like the pizza kid at my front door.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/25/2013 9:55:22 AM
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Re: analog design techniques
Quite so. And s/o else mentioned that you would do well to not reuse a section of wire previously wrapped, as it became fragile. So even moving a wire over one pin on an IC socket meant that you had to (or should) extract that wire completely and redo.

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patrick.mannion
patrick.mannion
3/25/2013 7:59:47 AM
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Re: analog design techniques
Yeah, making the wire-wrap circuits was easy, the unravelling part became a pain in the neck: but that only made us double - nay, triple - check that we were making the right connections!

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/24/2013 9:46:22 PM
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Re: analog design techniques
Altho' a bit messy at times if you miswired something and had to find the error (difficult to trace out the wiring) and then repair it (even more difficult to undo the wiring).

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
2/12/2013 3:41:10 PM
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Re: analog design techniques
I had completely forgotten about wire-wrapping prototypes. We did that too - and we mixed analog and digital just like you described. It was a pain to build, but it generally worked pretty well and pretty reliably.

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Clyde
Clyde
2/7/2013 12:02:22 PM
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Newbie
analog design techniques
Brad,

 

You left out wire wrap.  The first company I worked for had their own version of a perf board but actually accepted soldered components or sockets.  These boards had two internal planes and were orginally designed for 14 pin TTL logic.  The opposing corner pins were wired to the plands for +5 V. and return.  We also built many an analog circuit ground, cutting the power and ground traces as necessary.

Wire wound sockets were used for the ICs, and headers were used for passives and transistors.  Power transistors were inserted directl into the board with their heatsinks attached.  The piecs were then interconnected with 2-level wire-wrap.

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Maciel
Maciel
1/31/2013 6:25:51 AM
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Newbie
Prototyping
@ Brad,

Some companies provide services at low cost prototyping:

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/fusion-pcb-service-p-835.html?cPath=185

It might be worth checking out.

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