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Brad Albing

Harvesting Power From Piezo Transducers

Brad Albing
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B_Albing
B_Albing
7/29/2013 6:01:22 PM
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Re: Re : Harvesting Power From Piezo Transducers
@Sunita - thanks - I'll take a look at their products.

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SunitaT0
SunitaT0
7/29/2013 3:45:41 PM
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Re : Harvesting Power From Piezo Transducers
Arveni's piezoelectric harvesters are allowing a variety of applications: remote controls, wall switches for home-based automation and building infrastructure, the main adopter of energy harvesting technologies so far. There are also wireless sensor networks, asset tracking GPS/GPRS for industrial applications, condition monitoring sensors etc. The company calls its product a "Pulse Harvester", as it provides a small amount of electrical energy (up to 2 mJ) in response to a user action such as a push or a twist.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
7/10/2013 8:12:55 PM
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Re: A great era for sensor technology
That's good. I'll use that plus a little of my own thoughts. There's a poll or two there plus at least one blog.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
7/7/2013 11:10:25 PM
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Re: A great era for sensor technology
@DaeJ - that's the crux of the issue - make your system sleep most of the time, then wake up and do what needs to be done while drawing hardly any power, and then go right back to sleep.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
7/7/2013 11:08:11 PM
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Re: A great era for sensor technology
Yep - there's that pesky cost-of-cabling issue that I mentioned before - labor and material for most industrial/transportation applications regarding cabling runs into high costs.

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DaeJ
DaeJ
7/7/2013 6:19:34 PM
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Re: A great era for sensor technology
As energy harvesting is developed in the electronic area, I expect that there is no more AA or AAA battery pack in any application note of IC vendor. Main concern is to how mch current can be drawn from the harvesting energy in pick time (operating mode) and sleep time of any application.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
7/7/2013 5:49:12 PM
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Re: A great era for sensor technology
@netcrawl--"$1 can cost you about 50 times"

I think this is an area where self-powered (i.e. through battery, super cap, harvesting, etc.) wireless sensors might really start to have an advantage.  No cabling, no running signal wires all the way back to the control room, no phone lines to the sensor node, etc.

Once I had a light switch that I really needed in a different place.  It controlled an outlet (this is pretty common construction now--a wall switch controls an outlet for a floor or table lamp).  I bought a battery powered wireless switch that came with receiver that plugged into the outlet, then the lamp plugged into that.  The wireless switch could be mounted anywhere--it was a little thick so not completely elegant but that was 25 years ago.  Much cheaper than trying to pull wire.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
7/7/2013 5:44:55 PM
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Re: A great era for sensor technology
@Brad "Anyone who wants to toss a few ideas out as comments here, please do that"

It might be interesting to poll what type of electronics people are seeing built into sensors:

Analog front end (signal conditioning)

A/D conversion

micro-controller

micro-processor

system on board

...

There are probably more sensible breakdowns so this just food for thought.

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Netcrawl
Netcrawl
7/7/2013 9:39:11 AM
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Re: A great era for sensor technology
@easpres you're right its a great era for sensors. for the last few years we have witnessed a lot of changes in the world of sensors, they're become much smaller, less expensive and low power, driven in part of Moore's law and MEMS evolution.

Unfortunately the cost of running sensors has not kept pace, the're getting expensive- the cost would probably the main barrier here. A good example is if you want to move a closest light switch, running a wire for a $1 can cost you about 50 times! the would be $50 mostly on installation and labor, even in some industrial or automation industries- a sensor installation would cost a company about $10,000, and its only a simple switch. We still facing an uphill battle here. 

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
7/6/2013 12:58:35 AM
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Re: A great era for sensor technology
I'll put together a poll along the lines of what you've suugested. Anyone who wants to toss a few ideas out as comments here, please do that now so that I am sure the poll I create is properly representative.

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