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Maxim Integrated - Integration Nation
David Andeen

Putting the Customer in Analog Integration

David Andeen
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/28/2013 11:13:23 AM
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Re: Integration & Power consumption
Actually (just to pursue that a little bit), you'd end up with something that looke like one of those cell phones (or even wireless residential phones) that was the size of a brick. Ah... what memories.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/20/2013 5:25:37 PM
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Re: Integration & Power consumption
David, never thought of it from that perspective - assembling a smart phone from mid-90s technology. And not just from the perspective of PCB square inches, but power draw.

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David Andeen
David Andeen
1/27/2013 9:38:21 AM
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Re: Integration & Power consumption
Fascinating!  This appears to be right on, and yet another reason we'll see more applicaitons, like distributed, energy harvesting sensors.  I also loved seeing old names on that graph, like Commodore 64.

 

You're absolutely right about RF energy consumption.  Here's a cool project...put together modern smart phone functionality with technologies circa 1995.  I wonder what that thing would look like, and how much power it would consume.

 

Many analog sensing functions add very little power consumption, so I see this trend continuing, especially as microcontrollers get embedded into highly integrated analog parts.  I haven't done an actual computation, it seems like you would want to somehow couple in analog functions, like battery charging, while aren't going to involve so many calculations, but greatly improve battery life when integrated and moved to switch mode.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
1/27/2013 1:40:05 AM
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Integration & Power consumption
Hi David--great thoughts.  A couple years ago McKinsey had an article that showed a trend of computations/kwh vs. time.  The trend was linear upwards with a log scale for the computations/kwh axis.  The article can be found here:

http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/10/computing-power

The line of reasoning was that what had been happening since 1945 (Eniac) was decreasing the power per flop and that was the real underlying trend, not size or density.

What I find interesting is deeper analog integration should conform to a trend like that as well; we have already seen wireless technologies rapidly dropping in power consumption.  As the sensing side (analog) becomes more integrated with the rest of the electronics, that should also help lower power/performance.  What do you think about analog integration vs. power consumption?

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
1/25/2013 8:27:31 PM
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Smart grid & LED lighting; who will lead us from the darkness?
David - I personally have a strong interest in smart grid and LED lighting, so I'm quite intrigued (or I will be intrigued) as developments from the semiconductor manufacturers show up on the market. And yes, the creative guys will lead, so I'll expect amazing things from these folks with regard to integrated analog functions pertaining to LED lighting and smart grid. Should be exciting if they pull it off.

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