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Michael Steffes

Measuring & Modeling Wideband Baluns for Application to ADC Input Stages

Michael Steffes
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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/24/2013 9:41:25 PM
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Re: Transformer history
Of course, these transformers are rather more sophisticated that the ones that George Westinghouse and Charles Steinmetz were working with. Somewhat wider bandwidth and more predictable response with regard to common- and differential-mode behavior.

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Bill_Jaffa
Bill_Jaffa
2/27/2013 6:24:28 PM
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Re: Transformer history
Sorry,I forgot to include the link to an interesting resource on their history:

http://edisontechcenter.org/Transformers.html

and there are many more you can find.

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Bill_Jaffa
Bill_Jaffa
2/27/2013 6:16:49 PM
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Transformer history
Interesting that the transformer--among the oldest electrical components--still finds so may roles. The induction principle was discovered in the 1830s, and the first commnercial transformers were used in the 1880s--but they were for power, not signal.

A properly designed and used transformer can be an extremely reliable device and a solution to a lot of problems in signal isolation, baluns (as this blog shows), power transfer, voltage/current step-up/down, impedance matching, and many others. Not bad for a "dumb", passive part!

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