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ADC Guide, Part 1: the ideal analog/digital converter

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SunitaT0
SunitaT0
3/19/2013 1:29:33 PM
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1LSB vs resolution
Sachin and Akshay, thanks for the detail description on the ADC.
1LSB is equal to VFs / 2^N, it stands to reason that better accuracy (lower error) can be realized if we use a higher resolution and/or use a smaller input voltage. The problem with higher resolution (more bits) is the cost. Also, the smaller LSB means it is difficult to find a really small signal as it becomes lost in the noise, reducing SNR performance of the converter. The problem with reducing the input voltage is a loss of input dynamic range. Again, we also can lose a small signal in the noise, causing a loss of SNR performance.

One suggestion, it will be great help if you can add all the links of the previous posts on ADC guides in your upcoming posts (like "Related posts").

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amrutah
amrutah
3/19/2013 2:26:23 PM
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links to all parts...
I agree with SunitaT, if the links to all the parts of the ADC series 1-13 and further are available at one place then it will be helpful.

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amrutah
amrutah
3/19/2013 2:27:13 PM
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Re: 1LSB vs resolution
@sunitaT: To add to your point, "the smaller LSB means it is difficult to find a really small signal as it becomes lost in the noise...". 

Higher resolution will lead to many constraints on the quantiser, the offset of the quantiser will become comparable.  The memory requirements will increase.  Do you see any further complexities???

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/19/2013 4:57:21 PM
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Re: 1LSB vs resolution
I'll try to get those links added. But in the meantime, use the search function (upper right) and search on either of the authors' names or "ADC Guide" - that should point you to the other posts.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/19/2013 4:58:23 PM
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Re: links to all parts...
I'm working on it!

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