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mfratus2001
mfratus2001
12/28/2016 10:59:03 AM
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Newbie
Re: Preserving Data Books From Yesteryear
On my site I have strived to collect and maintain links to good references from all over, in the form of scanned books, PDF's, and videos. One could spend literally hours following links and reading the references.

fratus-amplification.com/Learning.html

fratus-amplification.com/Links.html

...and so on. There is so much there that I have trouble maintaining it.

Mike Fratus, Fratus-Amplification.com in Houston, Texas.

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Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
12/26/2016 4:49:26 PM
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Blogger
Re: Preserving Data Books From Yesteryear
@Crash McBang, I remember the last book I got rid of, it was about ASP.Net (version 1.0, so it was absolutely obsolete and useless). I find paper books useful, enjoyable and convenient. I use to write down comments and notes on my books for later use. Maybe the book that has suffered more the weight of my pencil is "Microelectronics Digital and Analog Circuits and Systems" by Jacob Millman. It is a 1979 edition.

Of course I sometimes "repurpose" some other books. These two books in the picture below are more useful serving to get the oscilloscope closer to my eyes than for their initial purpose ;). I nearly hate Visual Basic but I found it usefull too, LOL. The other book, LabView, well, I'm ten times faster (or more) programming in any other structured language than in LabView, thought many other engineers feel confortable with LabView.



Not all application notes and operating principle explanations we used to find in books from analog devices, burr brown, texas and others are easily accessible today, or even exist in the internet. The internet is so full of garbage today that it often makes it difficult to find accurate information.

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Arnaudlav
Arnaudlav
12/26/2016 7:23:41 AM
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Newbie
Re: Preserving Data Books From Yesteryear
I need some this magazine for my new installation

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D Feucht
D Feucht
12/16/2016 3:16:58 PM
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Blogger
Re: Preserving Data Books From Yesteryear
McBang,
I would tend to agree with Aubrey (antediluvian - which means before the Flood, though he could hardly be that old!) that the Web is not merely a superset of what is in print. The Web is huge, but what is in print is also immense. They overlap significantly but not entirely. That they overlap as much as they do is because of efforts like Aubrey's to scan and post paper info.

Plus, I find paper easier to read than a LCD, LED, or CRT display. Perhaps this is just the familiarity of longstanding habit, but I prefer paper books. Not only are they easier on (older, especially) eyes, it is easier to search them. I can flip through the pages of a book much faster (while looking for key images or text) than through computer screens.

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D Feucht
D Feucht
12/16/2016 3:15:19 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Preserving Data Books From Yesteryear
McBang,
I would tend to agree with Aubrey (antediluvian - which means, before the Flood, though he could hardly be that old!) that the Web is not merely a superset of what is in print. The Web is huge, but what is in print is also immense. They overlap significantly but not entirely. That they overlap as much as they do is because of efforts like Aubrey's to scan and post paper info.

Plus, I find paper easier to read than a LCD, LED, or CRT display. Perhaps this is just the familiarity of longstanding habit, but I prefer paper books. Not only are they easier on (older, especially) eyes, it is easier to search them. I can flip through the pages of a book much faster (while looking for key images or text) than through computer screens.

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D Feucht
D Feucht
12/16/2016 3:14:45 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Preserving Data Books From Yesteryear
McBang,


I would tend to agree with Aubrey (antediluvian - which means, before the Flood, though he could hardly be that old!) that the Web is not merely a superset of what is in print. The Web is huge, but what is in print is also immense. They overlap significantly but not entirely. That they overlap as much as they do is because of efforts like Aubrey's to scan and post paper info.

Plus, I find paper easier to read than a LCD, LED, or CRT display. Perhaps this is just the familiarity of longstanding habit, but I prefer paper books. Not only are they easier on (older, especially) eyes, it is easier to search them. I can flip through the pages of a book much faster (while looking for key images or text) than through computer screens.

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EdwardB8
EdwardB8
12/15/2016 4:06:49 PM
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Newbie
Popular Electronics Magazines and Books
Snap:  Linear Applications Handbook, 1986 edition

An excellent reference.

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antedeluvian
antedeluvian
12/15/2016 3:20:26 PM
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Blogger
Re: Preserving Data Books From Yesteryear
@Crash McBang

Based on the responses that I have got, I can only say that there are many people who disagree with your assertion that everything is on the web- it was certainly my desire to accumulate the knowledge that I had and had not made it to the web and place it there. The data on the web did not just get there by itself. Unfortunately there is much that has been lost.

You should also (re)read Denis' article to get the feel of what you get from books compared to the stuff on the web. I know it's a new world that I appreciate in terms of its speed and convenience, but I would bet that without the accumulated data every now and again someone re-invents the wheel. I see it in some of the Design Ideas that get published in EDN and Electronic Design.

 

 

 

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Crash McBang
Crash McBang
12/15/2016 2:11:39 PM
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Newbie
Re: Preserving Data Books From Yesteryear
I got rid of all my databooks once I found that I could google almost any part number.

As for design stuff and app notes, for the most part they are a google away or in my bookmarks.

Instead of reminiscing about the past, why not build up a set of links to design articles and websites?

Those would be far more helpful than an armful of musty old books.

Here's one of my favorites for audio stuff, Elliott Sound Products:

sound  dot whsites  dot  net

Keep adding to a list on Planet Analog for newcomers and old-timers that want to 'browse'...

 

 

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Crash McBang
Crash McBang
12/15/2016 2:10:50 PM
User Rank
Newbie
Re: Preserving Data Books From Yesteryear
I got rid of all my databooks once I found that I could google almost any part number.

As for design stuff and app notes, for the most part they are a google away or in my bookmarks.

Instead of reminiscing about the past, why not build up a set of links to design articles and websites?

Those would be far more helpful than an armful of musty old books.

Here's one of my favorites for audio stuff, Elliott Sound Products:

sound dot whsites dot net (sorry, planet analog doesn't like links posted in replies)

Keep adding to a list on Planet Analog for newcomers and old-timers that want to 'browse'...

 

 

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