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ssarmentoalves
ssarmentoalves
3/29/2017 2:05:14 PM
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hi
Hi dear, Please contact me for a special reason (ssarmentoalves@gmail.com)
Thanks,



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tydeuty
tydeuty
2/6/2017 4:21:21 PM
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Newbie
RE:Visual Studio hoverboard
Thanks for the feedback. It does look like MS is moving that direction, I believe they are working on incorporating SSH into the PowerShell through OpenSSH, as well as the projects listed here: https://opensource.microsoft.com/?tag=internetofthings

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tydeuty
tydeuty
2/6/2017 4:17:54 PM
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Newbie
Thank you, glad you liked it.

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happyman
happyman
2/6/2017 2:33:34 PM
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Newbie
RE:Visual Studio hoverboard
Great use of Visual Studio. It confirms the Microsoft strategy to move towards open source !

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tydeuty
tydeuty
2/5/2017 3:54:20 PM
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Newbie
Re: Develop for Linux on Windows
Hi Victor,

 

The short answer to your question is if anyone is planning on extensively and/or exclusively developing Linux applications, Visual Studio (at least at the current time) is not the way to go. However, if someone is a developer and is very used to the Windows OS and Visual Studio IDE who has taken an interest in writing Linux applications, they can do so using the features in the article.

I have been a Linux system administrator, worked tech support for Apple, and I'm currently a Windows system administrator, so I've seen the pros and cons of each. I personally would use Linux for servers and Windows for personal and development machines. Windows has recently brought over many features that I had missed from using Linux distributions such as workspaces and the PowerShell. Linux-influenced features like these combined with the benefits of having a huge chunk of the market share make Windows a powerhouse in my opinion and the opinions of others. So if people are like me and enjoying (or in your case forced to use) Windows, but want to develop for Linux, they will be glad to have the ability to.

I'm also most familiar with Visual Studio and have existing projects in it. I am a big fan of the customizable interface VS provides, the debugging experience is very helpful. I like being able to hover over a variable and getting its current value or having values updated highlighted in red as well as other features. It has support for third-party source control like Git and a great integration for GitHub. There's something to be said for maintaining consistency in your development environment while tacking on extra uses for it like developing for a different platform. My opinion is that the advantage here is not having to install, configure, and learn a new environment just to develop some applications for an IoT device that might be completely designed and developed in Windows.

I also am personally against using virtual machines on my development machines. With SSDs gaining popularity, the disk space we were enjoying is not always there on our laptops for a second OS and IDE. Bringing the OS one step further away from the hardware is also a detriment. Most VM's have their resources limited to somewhere around half of what the machine they are residing on can do as well, so they underperform. My opinion was that logging in to a Windows machine with an industry-standard IDE and then booting up a VM just to write for a different platform was ridiculous. However, a dual-boot situation could remedy this issue.

Here are some situations where I see the method in the article coming in handy:

1. In your case, you are forced to use Windows. At least now you can write Linux applications from your cage!

2. Many students studying programming are used to the Windows environment. I'm assuming that it is due to the market share of Windows machines that most of the programming courses are taught for Windows and Visual Studio and the students are asked to install a VM if they don't have a Windows machine. In later courses they are taught to write using the POSIX API for Linux applications and are asked to compile on the school's Linux server or in their own VM. I already have many fellow students using this method to avoid the time and energy it takes to install, configure, and learn a new environment mid-semester. You may be horrified to know that there are many students writing their C++ code using the Windows compiler and then just copying the source files to Linux and hoping it will work there as well!

3.  If someone is a power user with Windows who can pump out work quickly leveraging that OS, they still can and now write Linux applications. If this person was not used to Linux they would have a steep learning curve that is now unnecessary until you get into extensively writing for Linux.

All of that being said, if someone is going to be focusing on being a Linux application developer then of course they should dive in to the Linux operating system for their development machine. I expect to see a blurred line between Linux and Windows developing in the future now that Microsoft has partnered with Canonical and joined the Linux Foundation. Thanks for the comment!

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Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
2/4/2017 12:34:35 PM
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Blogger
Develop for Linux on Windows
I work extensively on a Windows machine, not because I like it but because I'm forced to. I can hardly see why would anyone develop Linux applications on Windows using Visual Studio. I'd like to hear your opinion about it.

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