REGISTER | LOGIN
Home    Bloggers    Blogs    Article Archives    Messages    About Us   
Tw  |  Fb  |  In  |  Rss
Dennis Feucht

Microcomputer-Based Instrument Model, Part 1: A General Instrument Architecture

Dennis Feucht
Netcrawl
Netcrawl
9/13/2014 9:35:30 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: Modularity is the key
@Vishal good point, the key challenge facing engineers today is to minimize or reduce the time taken for the design and optimization of components. Many times the software have become the bottleneck in every design, its probably one of the biggest key factors contributing to the output failure

Making the software independent is also a good idea, seek an independent software architecture and strategy advice, a small amount of money spent on an independent assessment from a qualified consulting firm can prevent a major mistake or disaster.

50%
50%
Vishal Prajapati
Vishal Prajapati
9/13/2014 7:32:52 AM
User Rank
Master
Modularity is the key
Modularity is the indirect key to success in the market. It drastically reduces the time to market. So, rolling out new instruments or model one after another changing the trivial functionality to suit the exact application is the key stay fresh in the market.

 

Another benefit by making the software as independent as possible is that development time is drastically reduced. Which makes it easy to customise the instrument for special needs. In short the modularity is the key to success in the market and may be the survival key also.

 

50%
50%
More Blogs from Dennis Feucht
Previously we looked at the electronics and sensors involved in data acquisition systems (DASs). Now we look at what to do with the raw ADC data once it is acquired.
This is a tutorial presentation of principles of instrumentation that is typically multi-channel, medium to high resolution (12 to 20 bits) and relatively slow - slower than oscilloscopes in sample rate
Continuing the chat from last time, we turn now to a circuit-related topic, that of current waveforms. The typical converter input waveform is shown with a static (dc) component and a ripple (ac) component
Semiconductor companies have now had fully-differential amplifiers in their product lines for a few years, though these amplifiers have been in leading-edge electronics for decades. These diff-amps are differential not only at their input but also at their output, doubling output range.
flash poll
educational resources
 
follow Planet Analog on Twitter
Planet Analog Twitter Feed
like us on facebook
our partners
Planet Analog
About Us     Contact Us     Help     Register     Twitter     Facebook     RSS