REGISTER | LOGIN
Home    Bloggers    Blogs    Article Archives    Messages    About Us   
Tw  |  Fb  |  In  |  Rss
Dennis Feucht

Electronics Lingo & Slang

Dennis Feucht
Page 1 / 3 Next >
Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
11/29/2016 2:27:57 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bug
Hi Dennis, interesting post, thanks.

Probably the most widely spread meaning for "bug" makes reference to software errors but it also refers to hidden listeing devices.

This photo here (from wikipedia commons) is very representative:



 

50%
50%
D Feucht
D Feucht
11/18/2016 8:31:57 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bug
Thanks for your two additions to the dictionary of electronics slang. Actually, "bug" started as a hardware slang word. It referred to the insects that degraded telephone lines in the early days. Its use by software people picked up from its hardware use.


Smoke test should be in the list too. And yes, maybe it is not really slang - not in power electronics!

50%
50%
steve.taranovich
steve.taranovich
11/18/2016 4:16:05 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Back in the 80s
@D Feucht--excellent information--thanks

50%
50%
Andy_I
Andy_I
11/18/2016 9:30:13 AM
User Rank
Artist
Bug
Wouldn't "bug" qualify?  I see it used almost as much today for hardware "mistakes", as for software.

"Smoke test" is another slang term in frequent use, but maybe it is less slang and more realistic.  Related to "letting the magic smoke out" (which I first heard much later).

50%
50%
D Feucht
D Feucht
11/17/2016 6:38:52 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Back in the 80s
Steve,
Circa the early 1980s, I ventured to use the NE5539 op-amp in an instrument prototype. It is quite appealing on the paper datasheet, though it has too many poles too close to each other, as I also found out!

I still like the idea of the part, though. It has some circuit features that can possibly be stepping-stones to the next amplifier circuit breakthrough, such as CFAs became - except something else.

 

"DC to daylight" was an expression that came from the oscilloscope vertical amplifier designers at Tektronix. The 7104 1 GHz analog scope was the acme of that achievement.

50%
50%
steve.taranovich
steve.taranovich
11/17/2016 2:16:31 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Back in the 80s
In the early 80s I was designing a high speed amplifier chain with NE5539 amplifiers. What a beast that was to tame! Signetics introduced it in 1979 and it had a Gain Bandwidth (GBW) product of 1.2 GHz which was pretty incredible at the time. I remember that Signetics said it had a frequency response from "DC to daylight". The caveat to using this smoking fast video amp was that it was inherently unstable and required some creative stability circuitry which included some pretty tiny capacitance in the single-digit pF area.

My engineering manager introduced me to the 'gimmick'. He told me to solder two small insulated wires across the feedback resistor, then twist them until the oscillation was dampened of disappeared. I never learned that in engineering school!

Brings back memories.

50%
50%
David_Ashton_EC
David_Ashton_EC
11/16/2016 2:32:40 PM
User Rank
Teacher
Firing it up
And when you've got all your caps and coils and whatnot together, you "Fire it up" like an old steam locomotive.

Tubes/valves used to be "bottles" and transistors are "trannies" though this can be confusing in this day and age, not least as it's also used for transformers.....  I've also heard "triffids" used (from John Wyndham's book).

Not directly related to components, but if things go wrong you'll "let the magic smoke out" in which case you may have to RTFM (Read The Flamin' Manual" though there are other interpretations.

50%
50%
jonharris0
jonharris0
11/16/2016 8:53:22 AM
User Rank
Blogger
Great post, enjoyed it!
Enjoyed reading this.  Several I use or have heard others I haven't heard before.  I've now seen high speed ADCs drawing over an 'amp' of current off of the 'DC' supply 'rails' where we have lots of 'caps' for decoupling.  With so much current draw there is definitely a concern for the 'thermals.' We recommend use a good R&S 'box' with low phase noise to drive the clock and analog inputs.  We have a soft reset that hit the 'flops' in the 'glitch' free digital inside the ADC digital section. We advise good layout to avoid any type of 'ground bounce' from other circuitry nearby the ADC from creating issues with noise or 'spurs' in the FFT.  Also we sometimes have to 'kludge' together some things in the lab to duplicate a customer's application based on just a 'snivet' of info.  And sometimes we need to get a 'scope' and 'poke around' on the board to troubleshoot.  Ahh, that was fun!  Last one I might add that I don't enjoy hearing is the use of 'low hanging fruit' which I think is way overused jargon, but I digress.  Thanks again, enjoyed this!

50%
50%
clayga
clayga
11/16/2016 8:49:29 AM
User Rank
Newbie
Wireless...
For reference, no-one in the UK calls a radio a "wireless" these days except in drama or mock-throwback to the 1940's.

Other slang would include "interweb" as somewhat self-disparaging or passive-aggressive designation for the WWW.

Lastly, all good Program Manager types know that "we have an issue", never a problem - it's too much like admitting guilt!

50%
50%
More Blogs from Dennis Feucht
Previously we looked at the electronics and sensors involved in data acquisition systems (DASs). Now we look at what to do with the raw ADC data once it is acquired.
This is a tutorial presentation of principles of instrumentation that is typically multi-channel, medium to high resolution (12 to 20 bits) and relatively slow - slower than oscilloscopes in sample rate
Continuing the chat from last time, we turn now to a circuit-related topic, that of current waveforms. The typical converter input waveform is shown with a static (dc) component and a ripple (ac) component
Semiconductor companies have now had fully-differential amplifiers in their product lines for a few years, though these amplifiers have been in leading-edge electronics for decades. These diff-amps are differential not only at their input but also at their output, doubling output range.
flash poll
educational resources
 
follow Planet Analog on Twitter
Planet Analog Twitter Feed
like us on facebook
our partners
Planet Analog
About Us     Contact Us     Help     Register     Twitter     Facebook     RSS