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Dennis Feucht

Creative Engineering Requires Versatility

Dennis Feucht
michaelmaloney
michaelmaloney
7/24/2018 1:38:25 AM
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Re: Humorous writing
It's nice to see a little break in all the seriousness and technical aspects of the website here and I'm very glad I stumbled upon your article today sir! I had me a good enough laugh and like you mentioned about the topics which were a little bit less humorous, I will spend the appropriate amount of time pondering about the implications and impact upon us as we work through all the other bits and pieces of things. Thanks again for sharing this piece of writing with us!

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D Feucht
D Feucht
4/9/2017 10:02:28 PM
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Re: Humorous writing
Victor,

Muy verdad! I got it wrong; it is the ganabana. (I need to spend more time in Guatemala, soaking in Castellano Espaniol.)


I have not seen the other two fruits in the market here. There seem to be an endless supply of new fruits or vegetables or vines (such as talawala vines, that grow on old cohune palms) that can be eaten or tea made from them.

Guanabanas, or soursops as they are called in English, are extraordinarily tasty and are also a possible cancer cure, being researched in Germany. There are so many really good fruits down here that, for practical reasons (no engineering solutions yet!), are not exported to N. America, that they are but one of many subtle reasons for living in the tropics.

 

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Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
4/8/2017 12:43:21 PM
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Humorous writing
Hi Dennis,

The Tropic is full of challenges for engineers, and of course poses many versatility requirements for almost anyone, being an engineer or not. Hummidity varies so much, from high to very high to even higher... that it makes a lot of sense to think seeriously about "tropicalization" when designing devices to be operated in the Tropic.

Now, if you let me, I can see in your table one tropical fruit that makes my thoughts fly to my parent's house in my beloved Cuba, you call it "guyabana". We know it as "guanábana", this name was supposedly given by the original inhabitants of our island [now extint thanks to those beautifull and peaceful and human life lover persons that were the spanish conquerors].

We have two more fruits in our "patio" that are similar to the guanábana , one is the "anón" and the other is the "chirimoya". They have very different taste and the anón is the one I like the most.

This is the anón:



And this is the chirimoya:



Many people in Europe think they are all the same...but they are to me as identical as MOSFETs and BJTs are.

Thanks for your writings, I enjoy them very much.

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