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Steve Taranovich

Understanding the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP)

Steve Taranovich
steve.taranovich
steve.taranovich
9/18/2018 12:31:42 PM
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Re: EMP Testing
@jnwoo1----That work must have been so cool! Thanks for sharing this excellent experience with our readers

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jrw001
jrw001
9/18/2018 10:09:15 AM
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EMP Testing
My first job out of college was EMP testing for the Air Force.  I worked with 3 types of EMP testing, High Energy Pulse (Trestle), Direct Drive (Inductive), and Continuous Wave (Network Analyzer Sweep).  I helped with the EMP Test for the Air Force One Comms System and Boeing was the prime contractor (they did an amazing job).  I used the "out of place" oscope on the main panel and still smile when I see it in videos.  Damped Sinusoids are what you mostly record, the frequency range of the EMP Pulse is 100 kHz to 250 MHz.  I had a semi trailer of the latest tech to myself for years and I learned a lot and had fun.  I wrote my first C program on the uVax II and that is all I've been doing since.  Frying all electronics is a stretch but system resets etc. is real so in a war situation, put your fleet over the north pole, set off a nuke, and attack.  

             

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steve.taranovich
steve.taranovich
9/17/2018 11:53:55 AM
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Re: Timely Topic
@D Feucht---good points--thanks for your observations---I will shortly be writing about methods to protect electronics. This is something we need to research and develop

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D Feucht
D Feucht
9/17/2018 10:12:31 AM
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Timely Topic
Steve,

Timely topic, considering both the recent behavior of the sun and geopolitics.

One big difference between lightning and a nuclear EMP from low earth orbit over the continental USA is that a lightning strike is highly localized, though conduction along a transmission line extends the effect. But an EMP event (as described in an EDN blog of mine at

www dot edn dot com/electronics-blogs/outside-the-box-/4421518/The-effect-of-a-nuclear-EMP-event-on-a-dental-implant

would not be localized and hence can affect not only power lines but any electronics not sufficiently shielded, including power-grid control electronics. So, while the lines themselves might survive, it is anything with integrated circuits that can be in trouble.

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