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Maxim Integrated - Integration Nation
Didier Juges

Integrated Analog: Whatís Missing?

Didier Juges
steve.taranovich
steve.taranovich
5/6/2018 5:00:53 PM
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Blogger
Re: This is nice article
Hello @Removed User---sorry, but this is the second time your comment was 'This is nice article'-----I appreciate that, but I would like to know why you think this is a nice article from 2014. You have no biography, so I do not know who you are. 

I am very concerned with 'spammers' and since I do not know who you are, then I may have to make you a 'Removed User' again---I do apologize if you are a serious reader, but you need to contribute more in your comments so I can be sure you are a serious reader who can add to our audience's knowledge and experience.

 

Please reply with more details as to who you are

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Didier_edn
Didier_edn
2/9/2014 6:14:34 AM
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Re: isolation
Hi AD,

Sorry it took so long to get back to your comment, my blog was published the day I left for Europe. It was a crazy short trip and I had no time for Internet or email... Good to be back home and good to be blogging again!

I have used digital isolators from Linear Tech and Analog Devices in an "analog replacement" function, sort of. Here was the application:

In a high power switch mode power supply, I had the need to monitor voltages, currents and temperature of components on both sides of the isolation barrier. I had the main processor on one side, monitoring the points that were galvanically connected to it's side of the bus, and a small processor on the other side connected to the main processor via serial UART and digital isolators. The secondary processor was monitoring the points that were on its side, converted the voltages to binary and shifted them to the main processor over serial, which handled the user interface and "normal" (read: slow, like over temperature) protection functions. This was not very fast but for the most part I did not need it to be very fast. One channel had to have a fast response time to overvoltage so the secondary processor could also drive a single opto-coupler indicating a need for immediate shut down without having to wait for the round robin serial loop. Running the ADC at full speed, the response time of that circuit was a fraction of mS, which was well sufficient.

The advantage of that solution (over installing digital isolators in a delta-sigma converter output) is that it gave me a back channel (main->secondary processor) at no additional cost which later allowed me to implement such functionality that was not originally required in the design.

There were actually two similar designs in that project and I switched from the Linear Tech part to the Analog part for the second project to take advantage of the smaller size. I did not need the increased isolation performance of the Linear part.

 

 

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antedeluvian
antedeluvian
2/5/2014 10:32:22 AM
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Blogger
isolation
Didier

Great to see you blogging again!

I am too far back along the trailing edge to be aware of the fancy new functions that you mention. However I am intrigued by the insertion of digital isolators to delta-sigma isolators to achive analog isolation. I actually mention this in the third part of my blog on Analog Isolation.

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