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One giant squeak for Mankind
4/3/2019

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Figure 1
Figure 1 (not fig. 3!) - the original circuit from 'Practical Electronics' magazine.

Figure 1 (not fig. 3!) – the original circuit from ‘Practical Electronics’ magazine.

Image 1 of 3      Next >

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steve.taranovich
steve.taranovich
4/10/2019 5:52:22 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Squeak
@Morgan Beaglemann---I agree---I am getting IT to look at fixing the font to make it black---thanks for the comment

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Morgan Beaglemann
Morgan Beaglemann
4/10/2019 3:52:46 PM
User Rank
Student
Re: Squeak
Thanks! Was not the schematic, but the light grey of the text against the white background! I ended up printing it to read. Have a good one, Mart

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studleylee
studleylee
4/10/2019 3:42:43 PM
User Rank
Newbie
Re: Squeak
If you do a ctrl-mousewheel on the clicked image you can zoom enough to read it's blurriness. The LTspice schematic says it all so not really worth mentioning.

It's interesing how the older articles don't really follow the schematic conventions of today

The circuit is much more recognizable if the gnd and -9v(gnd=>+9v and -9v=>gnd) labels are swapped and the entire thing redrawn upside down with respect to the original.

The signal souce and output load then ref'd to the 'new' gnd.

 

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Morgan Beaglemann
Morgan Beaglemann
4/10/2019 9:47:40 AM
User Rank
Student
Squeak
Great article on a topic I have never heard of. Only one problem, the font is of a grey-like color and is difficult to read; in fact neigh impossible to read. I havd to take the time to print in order to make it readible.

Art and creativity are one thing, but aren't you supposed to get the message across? Isn't that why we communicate?

Respectfully,

Martin

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