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Annika Elsen

11 things you need to know about resistors in pulse load applications

Annika Elsen
steve.taranovich
steve.taranovich
5/14/2019 3:17:52 PM
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Re: Carbon Film? Carbon Comp!
@didymus7---thanks for that added information---what is your application?

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didymus7
didymus7
5/14/2019 2:10:20 PM
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Carbon Film? Carbon Comp!
Admittedly, our application might be different from what is viewed in this article.  We deal with very low repetition capacitive discharges of 1000-1300 Volts.  We have found that using carbon film resistors as a load will begin to deteriorate at the first pulse.  Our loads are typically 0.5 to 5.1 ohms so the peak current is high, 1200 to 2200 amps.  What actaully survives are Carbon Comp resistors, which do not apparently deteriorate at all.  By deteriorate, I mean that the resistance begins to climb/get larger.  A 3 ohm carbon film resistor will actually be 4.5 ohms after the first discharge. And yes, we do have to use thru-hole resistors.

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