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Analog Angle

Should We Care if AM Radio Fades Out?

Bill Schweber
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samicksha
samicksha
9/21/2014 3:15:13 PM
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Re: Madness, not progress
Personally i dont want see AM Radio disappear, as it can allow information and entertainment at no cost to everyone. In my country people still prefer radio in cars rather than cd players.

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vbiancomano
vbiancomano
9/21/2014 12:38:25 PM
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Re: Madness, not progress
@eafpres1---From what I see initially, there are surprisingly about 20 college stations still on the air here in New Jersey, although virtually all of them are FM (one is listed as an AM station that apparently has since gone to an Internet radio format). Locally, we have one very active college station and a commercial AM station only a few miles away, for which I'm grateful.

Again, I much prefer old technology on this one, more for what it implies about lifestyle than anything else. But as for how signals get to my car in future and how "gadget/service of the day" technology imposes itself, I'll call it a draw as long as I can access my hometown talk and music station through a device I know as my car radio.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
9/20/2014 10:32:48 PM
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Re: Satellite radio
I think that in other parts of the world, AM is still king, such as China.  I suspect there will be a long life for technology that is obsolete in the US, in other parts of the world.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
9/20/2014 10:26:15 PM
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Even more super-broad band?
@Bill--do you think AM bands will be reallocated by the FCC at some point, auctioned for zillions of dollars, and become broadband internet spectrum?

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eafpres1
eafpres1
9/20/2014 10:24:44 PM
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Re: Madness, not progress
@Vincent--I think college radio is also all but gone too.

One counterargument is that nearly anyone can set up an internet "station" and stream content to end consumers.  Once all cars are connected with always-on IP links, then IP-radio and IP-TV will dominate.

I'm not sure the above is true, but food for thought.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
9/20/2014 10:22:39 PM
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Re: Satellite radio
@analoging--"Syrius Satellite radio continues to grow in market share across the overall radio market "

True, but only for "North America".  We tend to forget the rest of the world.  

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Hardware_man
Hardware_man
9/20/2014 7:25:47 PM
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Newbie
The "All American Five"
I don't think any discussion of old AM woukd be complete without mentioning the "All American Five", A.C. / D.C. radio. Early attempt at eliminating the power transformer. The tube filiments were set up so the 5 in series worked directly from the house 117 mains. The 35W4 and the 50C5, etc. One side of the line went right to the chassis. Depending on which way the plug was in the wall, maybe neutral or maybe hot. If a knob fell off and you touched the shaft, you knew when it was the hot side to the chassis. They must have taken the UL guy out to a long lunch to get that past :.)

 

Bill, I see you refered to the "switch" in the old car radio power supply as the interrupter. Avoided the popular term that could have a different meaning today :.)

 

Martin Risso

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analoging
analoging
9/20/2014 3:09:45 PM
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Satellite radio
Syrius Satellite radio continues to grow in market share across the overall radio market including automobiles, mobile devices and residences. No commercials, large selection, transmission in remote areas of US while driving. Can't beat it and prices can be negotiated down to $5 per month. I never listen to AM any more like an increasing amount of the population. News talk shows are being phased out in lieu of sport radio which is being shifted to satellite and FM now.

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vbiancomano
vbiancomano
9/20/2014 10:43:30 AM
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Madness, not progress
Yes, we should care. One area I want for AM is the hometown radio station, so as to put me in touch with the local community at a speed I can take in and without my being shackled to the computer. The advantage is human, not technological, and provides me with an outlet to slow down, not speed up.

One aspect of engineering that's seemingly been forgotten is the consumer's mental well-being as it relates to what the various technologies can provide (and, for whatever reasons, many reports suggest that mental illness is on the rise). There's definite good for me in technology that provides light talk and nostalgic music, versus TV and computer networks specifically designed to bring me 24-by-7 news/information that more often than not needlessly rattles my brain and is out of my control anyway. I don't need the "future shock."

Beyond that, instant feedback often makes for knee-jerk reactions (this is potentially disastrous in the battlefield). Ironically, it also makes for "paralysis by analysis" decision making (because there's too much information). I want old technology and what it traditionally brings. I want advanced technology when I really need it, not just because it's there.

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DaeJ
DaeJ
9/19/2014 10:46:53 PM
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Master
Reception of each station of either AM or FM
I realized that I came across a mix of voice from two radio station sometimes, while car is driven. But, that was happened at a certain location and could be depending on antenna and radio design.  

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