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Analog Angle

Get Ready for Retro Audio Cassettes & Landline Phones

Bill Schweber
David Ashton
David Ashton
12/6/2017 2:02:53 PM
User Rank
Artist
Cassettes...ugh...
Apart from wanting to play a collection of old ones, I can't understand why anyone would want to go back to Cassettes.  The average cassette and player sound pretty ugh, though I will grant that using good quality cassettes on good equipment did give reasonable results.

Jean-Luc, I am envious of your Reel-to-Reel machines.  Now THOSE are tape recorders!

Landline phones... the 500's were nice big solid phones but with pulse dialling they would not work on most modern exhanges?  I have a couple of old pulse/tone phones at work, I'll bring one home and try it.  Keypads, not dials :-(

Bill.. "There are even adapters which let you use the old-fashioned handset with a modern smartphone."   The ideal would be to have a dock that you slip your smartphone into when you get home, to get your calls on your house phones.  I guess you could do it with bluetooth (though not sure about dialling a call?) which would be a good solution - otherwise you'd need adapters for 1001 + different smartphones.  How about another article on what is available?

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MWagner_MA
MWagner_MA
12/6/2017 12:44:30 PM
User Rank
Teacher
Cassette at peak of technology still competes with CDs
In the 1980's you could buy equipment that was designed to last.  I still have a 1982 Technics Cassette deck (on loan to the mother-in-law), and a 1990 Yamaha 3-head deck in perfect condition.  I still listen to music recorded on TDK and Maxell CRO2 (cromium dioxide) high quality tapes.  The tapes are 35 years old and still sound great!  Good luck trying to buy pre-recorded tapes though.  Even back then the pre-made stuff was lousy.  If you are an audiophile, you recorded your own from some other source for convenience at the time. (LP -> Tape or CD-> Tape).

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Jean Luc.Suchail
Jean Luc.Suchail
12/6/2017 8:59:20 AM
User Rank
Artist
Audio cassette and tape recorders.
I still have a TEAC and a Thomson cassette recorders/players, as well as a TEAC, a REVOX and a PHILIPS tape recorders. All these items are in perfect operating conditions with the (few) belts recently replaced.

The TEAC X1000R with the DBX system, when using chromium tapes (EE) is giving 100dB dynamics and 22kHz bandwidth at 19cm/s. No noticeable difference from original CD.....

People should invest more on loudspeakers, it is in the vast majority the weakest point of the chain.....

 

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Pesky Varmint
Pesky Varmint
12/4/2017 11:29:18 AM
User Rank
Newbie
Landline phone audio quality
No question about it, the sound quality of the old landline was unmatched.

Sound quality was to me one of the major irritants of cell phones for a long time.

What proved to me what a joke it was, was using Cisco IP Communicator VOIP app

on my computer while using my smartphone as a Wi-Fi hotspot. And how I could

get crystal clear voice that way, but garbage when I use the smartphone alone.

Finally we got HD voice (essentially Voice Over LTE). However when I first tried it I got

a bit of a shock since it is true wideband audio, not the classic 3 kHz limited land

line bandwidth. It took me a bit to get used to hearing with clarity and bandwidth

but at least the mobile phone audio is getting better.

Then there is the "deer in the headlights" look I got when I would go into a mobile provider store and tell them I need a phone with a good RF front end since I live in a fringe area (I actually solved that problem with a booster).

As far as cassettes I don't know, my entire music collection is WAV files on a single thumb drive.

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