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Maxim Integrated - Integration Nation
Doug Grant

RF Integration Ė The Final Frontier

Doug Grant
Netcrawl
Netcrawl
3/11/2013 7:11:46 AM
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Re: Once chips are optical, all that's left is analog
There's one thing we need to get here: we need to cover as many bands as possible. The industry are moving to a level where it requires more bands and faster data rates, this is a serious matters, because this could puts more stress on the component.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
3/8/2013 6:40:05 PM
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Re: Once chips are optical, all that's left is analog
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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
3/8/2013 1:02:30 PM
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Re: Once chips are optical, all that's left is analog
eafpres - let me know when you get that s-parameter sense ckt designed.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
3/8/2013 11:08:05 AM
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Re: Once chips are optical, all that's left is analog
@Patrick--yes, and you also need tuneable matching networks because the s-parameters of antennas across all those bands aren't the same, or you might be switching among antennas, so you can either switch (and duplicate) the whole matching network component set or find a way to tune for each band.  If you had a front end integrated that could sense s parameters and match as well as tune the filter in a dynamic way, that would be pretty useful.

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patrick.mannion
patrick.mannion
3/8/2013 6:54:58 AM
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Re: Once chips are optical, all that's left is analog
I don't think it 'argues' against the integration of RF, eafpres, but what it does is add urgency to the need for programmable wideband filters to handle multiple standards, from 900-MHz 802.15.4 up to 5-GHz Wi-Fi and all else in between. MEMS filters have been eyed as a solution here for some time, but the different processes required for that are an obstacle, though I do hear of progress being made there.

Or, a direct-to-digital approach, which puts a lot of onus upon the A/D designers, and we're not quite there yet. Whatever happens, Doug's pointing to a huge opportunity for integration!

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Netcrawl
Netcrawl
3/7/2013 7:04:46 PM
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Re: Once chips are optical, all that's left is analog
Interesting article! thanks for the share, the latest teardown ofthe new  BlackBerry smartphones revealed the mobile phone's massive computing capabilities- its packed with sophisticated chips. I believe, a new type or breed of technology is about to emerge-something new! its optical quantum computing. Althought ist still in infancy and stage one- its will probbaly revolunize the way we build our stuff in the next couple of years. It replace those nasty electrical stufdfs on our chipsets.

 

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eafpres1
eafpres1
3/7/2013 3:04:10 PM
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Once chips are optical, all that's left is analog
I was teasing Martin Rowe over on The Connecting Edge about the evolution of optical communications and he retorted that we'd still have all that electrical stuff on the chipsets, to which I said "optical quantum computing is just around the corner, then we can be rid of those pesky electrons.

Martin then set me up of an onslaught by saying this "eafpres,

"So if I understand you correctly, all electrical engineers who will develop will really have to be trained as optical digital engineers. Thus, the only real electrical engineers will the the analog people. There are those who already argue at only analog engineers are real electrical engineers even today."

Seriously, though, do you think that the proliferation of so many wireless standards and rapid evolution of use models argues against more RF integraiton in the near term?

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