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Maxim Integrated - Integration Nation
Doug Grant

Is Cellular RF PA Integration Finally Here? Part 1

Doug Grant
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
4/2/2013 10:00:23 AM
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Doug Grant
Doug Grant
4/1/2013 11:45:25 AM
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Re: Envelope Power
I recall seeing an article recently somewhere by Earl McCune (I think) that defined the requirements for PAs in terms of how close to saturation they can run for various combinations of signal envelope and desired output power level. I can't put my hands on it at the moment, but IIRC, it used a limited number of levels as you describe. It looked interesting, but I'm not sure it scales for a seemingly never-ending parade of signal waveforms while always meeting the spectral mask rqeuirements.

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Doug Grant
Doug Grant
4/1/2013 11:33:57 AM
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Re: Still too risky?
Yep, spectrum allocations, etc. make things complicated. As long as PA designers are stuck with fixed passives to do filtering and matching, it's hard. Wait for my next post to see some possible ways around that problem.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
3/30/2013 1:28:15 PM
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Still too risky?
Hi Doug--it seems there is still so much going on in spectrum allocation and use, as well as modulation and spectrum reuse schemes, that it makes it risky to invest a lot integrating a PA, as a new requirement may pop up and then the whole chipset is not applicable to the new requirement.  If a vendor has a chipset that works over a range of spectrum, but only parts of that are used in a given country, would they typically optimize the front end including the PAs for the spectrum they will actually use?

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Netcrawl
Netcrawl
3/30/2013 7:55:26 AM
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Re: Envelope Power
@Scott very interesting thoughts! PAs are one of the most difficult RF components to be integrated on-chip for RF-SoC products, @Scott I agree with lots of players in that space but for me Qualcomm is the first one to take the deep and still getting better.  @Doug interesting topic! Thanks for bringing us a great article.  

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