REGISTER | LOGIN
Home    Bloggers    Blogs    Article Archives    Messages    About Us   
Tw  |  Fb  |  In  |  Rss
Doug Grant

Step Aside, MEMS: Here Comes NEMS

Doug Grant
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
RedDerek
RedDerek
1/1/2014 2:57:27 PM
User Rank
Master
If you really want to look ahead...
I remember when MEMS was in its infancy and all the drivers out there taking advantage of the technology - liquid drivers (inkjet printers), accelerometers, and mirrors.

Now we have the infancy of NEMS. Challenges will now to shrink corresponding parts to make things smaller to get NEM to replace MEMs.

We need to start looking ahead to PEMS and FEMS - Pico Electromechanical Systems and Femto-Electromechanical Systems. At some point do we start looking at AEMS - Atto Electromechanical Systems?

50%
50%
fasmicro
fasmicro
12/27/2013 5:41:28 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: 'nano-sensors'
>> The reason for low quality is not enough resources and guidance provided in the most of the institutes and universities. 

Universities can have high quality output. However, most times, it does not do much good to the funding company. Besides them focusing on more publishable works than what market wants now, there is also that IP is leaked as students graduate and they take off.

50%
50%
Vishal Prajapati
Vishal Prajapati
12/16/2013 11:50:14 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: 'nano-sensors'
You are right. Most of the time they are just a marketing stretegy.

 

The reason for low quality is not enough resources and guidance provided in the most of the institutes and universities. They are just selling degrees and not knowledge.

 

There are private sector research foundations which gives great support to really worth projects. Like Tata Institute of Fundamental Research.

50%
50%
goafrit2
goafrit2
12/16/2013 2:24:04 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: 'nano-sensors'
>>  and sometimes that collaboration ends-up with a new start-up/spin-off founded by some (or one) department professor(s) and/or PhD/MSc students

But the company that funded that research never owns those startups. Sure, can have the first option to pass an opportunity to acquire the company. It is a great way to support universities but anyone that banks that will bring innovation is not serious.

50%
50%
goafrit2
goafrit2
12/16/2013 2:20:42 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: 'nano-sensors'
@Victor, good point. I began like you with the notion that when things are open, the world is better. Unfortunately, I have not seen any truly successful public traded open source company. If Linux had gone closed, it might have made more money for his family. Where will Bill Gates will be if Windows is open? The fact is this - there is no A-grade idea that is open (except Linux) and anyone that comes out with how to cure HIV and post it on Google is good but may hast lost an opportunity to change another portion of this earth by the money he will make

50%
50%
Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
12/16/2013 1:37:41 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 'nano-sensors'
@Netcrawl, "(...) collaboration between universities and companies is a good starting point" and sometimes that collaboration ends-up with a new start-up/spin-off founded by some (or one) department professor(s) and/or PhD/MSc students, with graduate and doc/post-doc students working 'for free' on those projects.

50%
50%
Victor Lorenzo
Victor Lorenzo
12/16/2013 1:32:46 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 'nano-sensors'
@fasmicro, "The problem is that whe you do something anyone can have access, you do not gain any edge"

Interesting point of view. I used to be of the oppinion that closed source was better than open source in order to preserve know-how. But now I've changed at least a little bit after seen so much talent coming out from open source and hackers communities. Why not taking profit from that kind of collaboration, disclosing part of the code or using public domain tools and libraries, improving them and collaborate with community returning back the results?

It comes to my mind that, at the end, probably the edge is not in holding completely secret how the 'thing' is inside, probably the edge resides in how innovative it is and in providing the best in class service for it, that really makes a difference.

50%
50%
fasmicro
fasmicro
12/16/2013 12:55:46 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: 'nano-sensors'
In my strategy, I will prefer to buy companies than spending money on collaborations with universities. The problem is that whe you do something anyone can have access, you do not gain any edge. That is one problem I have with schools. It never stays in the lab and you can fund things that end up arming your competitors

50%
50%
fasmicro
fasmicro
12/16/2013 12:52:26 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: 'nano-sensors'
I personally think that most industry-university collaborations in the developing world are structured to be charities and marketing plans. Most of the companies do not expect anything big from those projects because the quality is low.

50%
50%
Netcrawl
Netcrawl
12/13/2013 5:52:30 AM
User Rank
Master
Re: 'nano-sensors'
I agree, collaboration between universities and companies is a good starting point, it could lead to more innovation and opportunities, information sharing is crucial in today's high technology game. If you're not making "any collaborative works" there's a big chance that your company might lost its competitiveness in the market.     

50%
50%
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
More Blogs from Doug Grant
If your interest is less in applications of analog technology than other problems, and you want to find out whatís happening in real analog, here's where you should be.
When it comes to this monthís ISSCC show, there are plenty of sections dedicated to solving issues with integrated analog technology. Here, our blogger looks at the sessions that offer new insight to difficult problems.
The International Solid State Circuits Conference kicks off February 9. While the mass media will focus on the biggest memory, faster processor, and smallest geometries reported, I prefer to look at the analog stuff.
A comparison of integrating large amounts of analog functionality onto a chip with simply using smaller individual analog function blocks. Which is better, cheaper, or easier?
flash poll
educational resources
 
follow Planet Analog on Twitter
Planet Analog Twitter Feed
like us on facebook
our partners
Planet Analog
About Us     Contact Us     Help     Register     Twitter     Facebook     RSS