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William Murray

Magnetic Field Sensors

William Murray
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DaeJ
DaeJ
7/12/2013 11:35:38 AM
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Master
Hall effect sensor - Vehicle
Simply by using hall effect sensor, vehicle speed or engine fan speed is detected and controlled, and also, in the hybrid vehicle, hall effect current sensor is used for monitoring regenerated DC voltage as very crucial factor in order to expand HEV battery life including regenerative brake. So, I guess that in the future, hall effect sensor will be one of main sensors in HEV vehicle.

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BillWM
BillWM
7/12/2013 11:49:30 AM
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Re: Hall effect sensor - Vehicle
Hall effect sensors are a good fit where ever dirt and oil are found.

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Netcrawl
Netcrawl
7/13/2013 10:18:06 AM
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Master
Re: Hall effect sensor - Vehicle
Interesting topic thanks for the share, hall effect sensor are used in industry to measure proximity of objects, speed, rotary positions, electric currents and intensity magnetic fields. These kind of  sensors are used in tachometers and electric motor. And companies like GE and Honeywell are good example of companies that perform well in this area. 

 


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antedeluvian2
antedeluvian2
7/15/2013 9:18:05 AM
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Newbie
proximity switches.
I remember the National Semi (now TI) V/F and F/V converterLM2907/2917 as being quite useful in interfacing to magnetic sensors in dtetcting the rotational speed.

 

I used regular proximity switches in a qaudrature arrangement to create a rugged linear displacement transducer. I wrote about it in the second half of my blog "Custom Sensors Enhance MCU Design" on MCC.

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Guru of Grounding
Guru of Grounding
7/17/2013 7:12:19 PM
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Teacher
Extreme Sensitivity?
The choices do seem overwhelming. I'm looking into the feasibility of a sensor that will detect the magnetic field produced by a single conductor carrying 1 mA or less. Frequency range of 50 Hz to perhaps 5 kHz is sufficient. I could always use a Rogowski coil but I have a suspicion that a more recent type of sensor may be well-suited, yet smaller and less expensive. Any ideas to save me the tedious searching.

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BillWM
BillWM
7/17/2013 7:35:43 PM
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Re: Extreme Sensitivity?
I would imagine some of the sensors used in some of the new hard-drive heads would be overkill, but possibly a GMR sensor of similar nature could be made to work.   Also some of the MEMS sensors can be small and sensitive.

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EMCgenius
EMCgenius
7/18/2013 1:25:24 AM
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guass tesla conversion
There are 10^4 gauss per tesla.  The article gets this backward.  It should say T=G/10^4, not T=G•104


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musiklab
musiklab
7/18/2013 7:31:30 AM
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Linear Hall effect probe application
I once used Siemens SAS 231 W hall device for measuring magnetic flux in an application- it would output a voltage proportional to magnetic flux. 

Anybody know of a similar device available today ? 

NOW,

I´d like to be able to measure a probe distance from a strong magnet, able to hold itself,  to measure   thickness in a range of 1-10 mm with a repeat accuracy of  0.1 mm or better, presented as a linear DC voltage,  scaled to the proximity law

and calibrated in millimeters on a digital readout . 

Any ideas ? Anybody?

pls contact >>  michael@edinger.dk

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B_Albing
B_Albing
7/18/2013 4:25:54 PM
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Editor
Re: guass tesla conversion
@EMCgenius - I'm confused about what you wrote. You said: There are 10^4 gauss per tesla which is true and matches what it says in the blog. But then you say It should say T=G/10^4 which is the inverse - and incorrect. A 1T magnet is a strong magnet. A 1G magnet - not so much.

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EMCgenius
EMCgenius
7/18/2013 7:44:17 PM
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Teacher
Re: guass tesla conversion
We are agreed then: a tesla is 10,000 times stronger than a gauss.  Therefore divide gauss by 10,000 to get teslas.  Multiply teslas by 10,000 to get gauss.  The conversion in the article is bass ackwards.  Plug one gauss into it and see if you believe the result.  If the exponent had a minus sign it would work.

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