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Jack Shandle

The Analog Designer Hall of Fame

Jack Shandle
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bobzz0
bobzz0
9/23/2015 6:31:27 PM
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Newbie
Re: more on the Analog Hall of Fame
Harold Stephen Black - negative feedback

Edwin Howard Armstrong - regen and super het circuits, he was also the one who figure out what to do with the audion / triode tube not De Forest

 

 

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JAYARAMAN KIRUTHI VASAN
JAYARAMAN KIRUTHI VASAN
8/11/2013 11:42:28 PM
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Master
Re: Hall of Fame
Jack,

I was searching for J.L.Baird, father of television and could not find his name. Am I missing it, by chance or is his name yet to be mentioned?

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Jack Shandle
Jack Shandle
8/2/2013 1:04:19 PM
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Re: Hall of Fame
@Videobub - P. Langevin and Ulrich Rhode are on the list now.

In case anyone is wondering, I've compiled the list as it stands after about a week of sporadic comments. Several names were suggested who worked for Tektronix, which is most appreciated.

Perhaps some other corporate historians/librarians can contribute similar lists. The one-name suggestions are fine but a list that has already been culled is even better.

Here's where we stand now:

Bob Widlar, designer of the first monolithic op-amp IC, the Fairchild μA702
Dave Fullagar, inventor of the first IC logarithmic and antilogarithmic op amps and the first monolithic FET-input op amp (ICL8007)
Hans Camenzind, who designed the 555 timer
Paul Brokaw for the Bandgap Reference
Barrie Gilbert for the Gilbert Multiplier Cell
Lee DeForest and/or John Ambrose Fleming, inventor the triode

Several from Tektronix
George Wilson (Wilson current mirror)
John Addis
 Art Metz
Ian Getreu contributed much to modeling the BJT.
Carl Battjes should certainly be included as a wideband amplifier designer.
Howard Vollum

Dr Trevor Wadley for his Wadley Loop
G. S. Meikle who invented the Tungar rectifier
Leo Esaki, inventer of the tunnel diode
P. Langevin who explored piezoelectricity for sonar applications
Ulrich L. Rhode, RF guru

 

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Videobub
Videobub
8/1/2013 9:46:05 PM
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Newbie
Re: Hall of Fame
There is a wealth of folks from the early days of electronics and physical properties. One is P. Langevin who explored piezoelectricity for sonar applications - in 1917! (http://www.ieee-uffc.org/main/history-bottom.asp).

And is RF guru Ulrich L. Rhode on your list? 

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Jack Shandle
Jack Shandle
7/31/2013 7:41:27 PM
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Blogger
Re: Hall of Fame
@ D Feucht -- Thanks for the recommendations (nominations) from Tek, which has a well-earned reputation for engineering innovation and excellence. (Tek has kind of cornered the market for Engineering Emmys in the field of TV technology, I think.)

In any event, the list is getting longer. The more names the better is my perspective on this. I would favor the "big tent" approach at least initially.

I was hoping that someone with personal knowledge (or even second hand knowledge) of the inner workings at engineering departments such as Tek would provide a few candidates who might be household names.

Maybe we'll hear from National, Maxim, Linear Technology, Analog Devices and a whole lot more companies in the near future. 

 

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Jack Shandle
Jack Shandle
7/31/2013 7:30:15 PM
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Re: Dr Trevor Wadley
One unintended consequency of writing my hall of fame blog is that I'm -- happily -- getting a short-course education in the history of electronics. The Wadley Loop is  a masterstroke of design for stabilizing superhetrodyne radio receivers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wadley_Loop

As Antedeluvian noted, iTrevor Lloyd Wadley was a South African electrical engineer.

Good nomination, to say the least.

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Jack Shandle
Jack Shandle
7/31/2013 7:20:12 PM
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Re: More candidates?
Leo Esaki shared a Nobel Prize for his work in electron tunneling so I would have no argument with his nomination. Ditto for G.S. Meikle for his work with Irving Langmuir – they were the two guys at GE who were the first to study controlled rectification in gas tubes.

Seems like the nominations are tilting toward the early years of electronics, which is probably a good thing because "greatness is for the ages."

Keep the nominations coming.

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Videobub
Videobub
7/31/2013 6:05:43 PM
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Newbie
More candidates?
Maybe G. S. Meikle who invented the Tungar rectifier (https://sites.google.com/site/johnengsdeadtechrescue/photos/tungar-power-supplies-and-chargers).

And Leo Esaki, inventer of the tunnel diode.

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antedeluvian2
antedeluvian2
7/31/2013 4:04:46 PM
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Newbie
Dr Trevor Wadley
I propose Dr Trevor Wadley for his Wadley Loop. Now in truth I don't know much about it other than I worked for Racal for a while in South Africa, but wherever I travel and I encounter a radio enthusiast and he discovers where I am from, the Wadley Loop always comes up. My boss still scours E-Bay for the Barlow-Wadley XCR-30.

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D Feucht
D Feucht
7/31/2013 1:53:58 PM
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Blogger
Hall of Fame
Jack, two thoughts come to mind about a Hall of Fame:

1. Mexicans appreciate engineers. On the sidewalk in front of the Guadalajara telepone building stands a bronze statue of the engineer who built much of the early Guadalajara infrastructure. He is leaning on the buiding with one arm while holding a slide rule in his other hand.

2. Tektronix internally had several Hall of Fame prospects, including Barrie Gilbert, but also others such as George Wilson (Wilson current mirror), John Addis, and Art Metz, about whom the outside world knows practically nothing but who is held in high esteem within Tek by fellow designers. Ian Getreu contributed much to modeling the BJT. Carl Battjes should certainly be included as a wideband amplifier designer. Then there is Howard Vollum himself. I would include Bruce Hofer, who is the analog founder of Audio Precision. So many talented people have come out of Tek that it would be hard to make a final selection.

The problem with Halls of Fame is that they selectively venerate certain prominent individuals while many near-prominent people are left out - unless it is a very inclusive Hall.

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