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goafrit2
goafrit2
6/3/2013 10:34:29 PM
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Re: Electronic Integration
>> But it has a serious drawback on product's reliability(I do think)

Hopefully as yield improves and processes mature, integration becomes very compelling. I hate it when yield is low and one is packaging everything in one die. I like the MEMS guys that are not crazy over the quest of moving to new processes pursuing feature size as old processes with long channel devices just work fine.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
5/15/2013 6:02:15 PM
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Re: Electronic Integration
See my other reply time-stamped 5/14/2013 2:38:12 PM. I think it's less of a concern than you make it out to be. You have to evaluate the cost*probability for failure vs. success.

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goafrit2
goafrit2
5/15/2013 11:21:28 AM
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Re: Electronic Integration
>> But it has a serious drawback on product's reliability(I do think). 

When you wholly-integrate, it is work or nothing since you cannot salvage anything. The risk model increases as the chip must perform as there is no other way to salvage it.

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goafrit2
goafrit2
5/15/2013 11:21:14 AM
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Re: Electronic Integration
>> But it has a serious drawback on product's reliability(I do think). 

When you wholly-integrate, it is work or nothing since you cannot salvage anything. The risk model increases as the chip must perform as there is no other way to salvage it.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
5/14/2013 2:38:12 PM
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Re: Electronic Integration
Goafrit2 - I agree with your point about more integration will save/lower cost. To your point about "too much integration [could] cripple a system... when failure hits [and] nothing can be saved," a quick comment. While I guess it's true strictly interpreting what you stated, I think you'll find that since your failure rate goes down overall, even with the occasional board that goes bad, you will just scrap it out and still be money ahead.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
5/14/2013 2:29:52 PM
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Re: Electronic Integration: one size fits all
DaeJ - it's always good to be concerned about IC reliability and to have your Quality Control people monitoring it. And you're right that it's tough to trouble-shoot defects inside the IC. But I'm confident that you will see better reliability with an integrated device that you would with the equivalent circuitry built with conventional ICs.

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DaeJ
DaeJ
5/5/2013 8:48:06 AM
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Re: Electronic Integration: one size fits all
Chip performance might be slightly different depending on the CMOS process used to fabricate all circuit such as cascade amplifier. They try to squeeze all circuit block as minimizing package size of IC. Secondly, I am concern about signal noise inside of chip. If they could provide output port as noise measurement and information and offer tuning parameter, it will be beneficial for customer in all aspect. By tuning parameter, all circuit function is changed to meet system goal.  Application engineer would access parameter and changing it via PC through USB, with a nice GUI. GUI will display all behavior of circuit inside chip.

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amrutah
amrutah
5/4/2013 11:39:56 PM
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Re: Electronic Integration: one size fits all
" Troubleshooting is not easy for chip itself."

  Any integration is complex and integrating many functionality on a chip is further complex.  Testing and validating the chip becomes very complex, but I think that will be the chip vendor's headache.  The org. or person building a system can concentrate more on making the product a success.  This will help reduce the cost and TTM.

  But when it comes to integration of many functionalities there needs to be a through understanding of the system so that all the possible scenarios is considered building a chip.

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amrutah
amrutah
5/4/2013 11:34:53 PM
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Re: Electronic Integration: one size fits all
DaeJ,

  "But, I am concerning about the reliability of the chips including all functionality. Secondly, there are more possible defects in inside of customized chips, even though internally chip validation is executed in the vendor."

   First the process should have good Yield, it that is right then the defects that you are talking will be a small factor.  every component has a FIT rate and having most of the devices integrated on a chip and with a good FIT rate should make the system solid and more reliable.

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Netcrawl
Netcrawl
5/4/2013 7:11:34 PM
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Master
Re: Electronic Integration
@goafrit2 you're right, it something to do with cost, integrating more we could solve one big problem here-the cost. But it has a serious drawback on product's reliability(I do think). 

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