REGISTER | LOGIN
Home    Bloggers    Blogs    Article Archives    Messages    About Us   
Tw  |  Fb  |  In  |  Rss
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Ranasinghe
Ranasinghe
6/30/2013 11:52:51 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: Home made boards?
Thanks for the links Vishal, It was very informative. 

50%
50%
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/24/2013 4:24:59 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3-D PCBs
Seems like the molten-solder-writing-pen would work in general, but you'd need a way to make sure that the solder stayed where you put it. That's a double problem - got to make sure it sticks to the board somehow; and got to make sure it doesn't flow away to places where it should not be.

50%
50%
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/11/2013 1:02:58 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Easy and Fast Prototyping
Still, it would be great to have one of the milling machines for those basement lab, home hobbyist projects. Maybe we can get Derek to buy one for us and then pay him a few bucks every time we want a board made.

50%
50%
Scott Elder
Scott Elder
6/11/2013 11:21:23 AM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Easy and Fast Prototyping
Those PCB Milling machines seem like tweener products.  Either one needs a board cheap (DIY) or plan 1-2 days in advance.  If one ever had a hot-hot project, then there are always board shops that will jump immediately on your project for a high premium--but still less cost than a machine.

50%
50%
RedDerek
RedDerek
6/11/2013 9:30:56 AM
User Rank
Master
Re: Easy and Fast Prototyping
When I was in the semiconductor industry, my company had an LPKF system. Very nice to use for the prototyping. But one would need to generate several boards to make it pay off; which we did as proto app boards before going to production.

50%
50%
Maciel
Maciel
6/11/2013 8:08:31 AM
User Rank
Newbie
Easy and Fast Prototyping
It sure is a good technique because a module can be reused several times, on different projects.

In many applications, knowing the risks utilize simulation tools, so I end up relying on a little faith that everything to be integrated on a printed circuit board, not a malfunction.

For those who can invest a little more in rapid prototyping, a good option:

http://www.lpkf.com/products/rapid-pcb-prototyping/circuit-board-plotter/index.htm

50%
50%
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/10/2013 10:48:22 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3-D PCBs
@eafpres >> use a sheet of copper backed with pressure sensitive adhensive... I used to use various versions of this stuff - one version was marketed as CircuitStix. Very convenient - tho' moreso in the days of DIP packages.

50%
50%
DEREK.KOONCE
DEREK.KOONCE
6/10/2013 5:49:08 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: Home made boards?
My metrics involve several factors - cost, time, free-time, etc.

To start, milling would be a great idea, if I had one in the lab. It would be my preferred method in many cases.

I would typically do a quick-turn, but as you noted, cost can be high, but the time is still 3 days minimum in my view - sending files, a day to manufacture, a day to ship, third day receive.

My last option is the cheapest, but involves my time to make the board, but by far the fastest. Between toner transfer - getting the print correct. Then making the transfer look good. Then touch-up before etching. Etch time (about 15 min). Then plating time (about 10 min). The whole cycle can be from 2 hours out to 3 hours - depending if I need to redo the toner transfer portion because it did not look good before etching.

I use either the second or third method. If I need to use more than 2 layers, or if I need solder mask, or if the two-layer requires many jumpers, I would use a fab house and bite the bullet for time and money.

If I need only one layer (up to a few jumper wires), then third method is usually the clear winner. Only issue is that there is no solder mask involved.

Another reason I would go with the fab house would be if the pitch is too fine, or if there are many parts with fine pitch - both of which would make toner transfer more challenging than I want to deal with.

50%
50%
Scott Elder
Scott Elder
6/10/2013 5:28:32 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Home made boards?
Derek, Could you please comment on the economics of prototype PCB work.  In other words, there are multiple ways to do this entirely by one person on the cheap.  Then there are milling machines.  And then there are overnight PCB services for $200 or so.  Where do you draw the line between each of these appoaches?

And then assembly.  Build inside with stencils or simply subcon the three or four board run?

As the saying goes, time is money.  So what level of sophistication pushes one outside versus DIY.

 

 

50%
50%
DEREK.KOONCE
DEREK.KOONCE
6/10/2013 4:02:40 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: Home made boards?
2nd board has no test point in the middle, it is a through-hole since a couple traces crossed. Trick here is layout to use a single-sided board. I could have used 0 Ohm resistors as jumpers, but too many traces to cross - thus a small wire on the back that is barely visible.

4th board has an LM3886 not installed. The LM device was to be configured as a current driver to help set the current signal that was needed if higher than a few 10's of ma was needed, plus it would be able to drive beyond the voltage limitations of a basic function generator. Things were not working so well, so I ended up simplifiying the proto board. to have limitations from a function generator.

My general test points in the corners are for banana connections and clip/scope leads. Keeping my options open as to how to interface to the rest of the world.

50%
50%
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


latest blogs
The primary difference between the speakers I designed and the micro- and mini-speakers that Eminence makes is that the diaphragm is connected directly to the voice coil as opposed to an Aluminum or cardboard 'former' to which the voice coil was connected
Autonomous driving represents one of the most interesting fields of research in the electronics and automotive sectors. This interest is growing by means of projects like the “Roobopoli” which includes the design and testing of prototype autonomous cars having integrated microcontrollers.
Using optimization to design circuits (some might call it organized guesswork – for some algorithms, that’s a pretty good description) isn’t a new insight.
The future of industry is represented by the massive utilization of IoT technology in realizing a more effective and reliable chain of production while maximizing the yield of industrial processes
How could I measure the light intensity of different light sources?
flash poll
educational resources
 
follow Planet Analog on Twitter
Planet Analog Twitter Feed
like us on facebook
our partners
Planet Analog
About Us     Contact Us     Help     Register     Twitter     Facebook     RSS