REGISTER | LOGIN
Home    Bloggers    Blogs    Article Archives    Messages    About Us   
Tw  |  Fb  |  In  |  Rss
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/24/2013 7:09:56 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Unprecedented temperature rise
Not a problem. Sometimes that's how the best discussions develop.

50%
50%
Etmax
Etmax
6/21/2013 3:04:57 AM
User Rank
Newbie
Re: Unprecedented temperature rise
Here I agree on all points, :-) I must also appologise for drifting so far away from power factor correction. I don't normally do that. Sorry guys.

50%
50%
vbiancomano
vbiancomano
6/21/2013 12:24:25 AM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Unprecedented temperature rise
Epidemiology and climate change have been closely linked in recent years, and thus researchers have not yet ruled out viruses as a "product" of that relationship. Indeed, they rule them in. In any case, in keeping to point, I do not see that we disagree on the issue of climate change and man's contribution to it. It's a matter of degree. There are many variables, their relationship as you know is nonlinear in many cases, and thus the grand system is very difficult to analyze.

50%
50%
Etmax
Etmax
6/20/2013 11:18:04 PM
User Rank
Newbie
Re: Unprecedented temperature rise
The frogs may be more related to a virus they have discovered but then the virus may climate related although I doubt it. What's happening in the oceans is significant in that CO2 is absorbed acidifying the oceans and adversely affecting shell fish. What is even more scary is that common foods become toxic in the presence of higher CO2 levels as the plants spend less effort growing. Examples are Yams and apricots produce cyanide and wheat and other grains produce less protein and more carbohydrate. They reckon by 2050 we may not be able to make bread due to low protein content. Further on this apparently locusts swarm more in years when proteing levels are lower so we have a many sided whammy. My main comment really was that it isn't unprecedented, only unprecedented in living memory. Yes interesting times and running out of time to do something. Every years delay increases dramatically the cost of doing something about it. We may get to the point where we no longer have the resources to combat it. That's the game over scenario

50%
50%
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/20/2013 4:53:36 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Paying for power factor
@Derek - that paper does help explain some of this PFC stuff  - thanks.

50%
50%
vbiancomano
vbiancomano
6/20/2013 4:22:20 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Unprecedented temperature rise
@etmax---Without quibbling too deeply over what constitutes "unprecedented" in the context of what we call modern times, I think it's most important to determine at what point the apparent acceleration in temperatures brings us to the point where our planetary system can be classified as being in thermal runaway. Indeed, we may have already arrived and don't know it yet. One initial confirming signature could well be mass extinctions, as you've brought up.

With air-sea interactions a very important part of the feedback loop, some of the more recent research cuts to the chase in examining why frogs and sea life, among other species, are right now disappearing worldwide.

50%
50%
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/20/2013 1:03:18 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Unprecedented temperature rise
OK, so it's a "precedented temperature rise." But, as you've noted, the outcome will likely be unpleasant.

50%
50%
Etmax
Etmax
6/19/2013 11:05:52 PM
User Rank
Newbie
Unprecedented temperature rise
You mention unprecedented temerature rise, and this isn't strictly true, the temperature has risen like this a few times in the past and each time it has been accompanied buy mass extinctions. If I put my hand in the fire and it burns and I do it a second time and it burns I would suggest I would be an utter fool to try it a third time, so each time in the past that temperatures rose dramatically it was a disaster I don't think we need to be surprised as to what the outcome will be this time.

50%
50%
Vishal Prajapati
Vishal Prajapati
6/18/2013 2:28:29 AM
User Rank
Master
Re: Paying for power factor
@Derek, Thank you very much for your reply. I think the trial and error simulation can be the only option for this thing. But this has cleared most of the theorical part. Thanks again.

50%
50%
Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/17/2013 4:41:20 PM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Paying for power factor
@KCP - thanks for that reminder that PF is degraded from unity by not only simple reactive elements or networks connected to the power line, but also by capacitor-input filter networks following a bridge rectifier and by "phase-cut" triac dimmers.

50%
50%
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


latest blogs
How can you accurately measure this impedance to give reliable lead-off detection in ECGs?
Fast switching transitions can yield some disadvantages. Interference in the frequency range of the switching transitions between approximately 20 MHz and 200 MHz increases dramatically.
The U-channel format consists of an open frame PSU mounted into a U-shaped aluminum chassis.
The primary difference between the speakers I designed and the micro- and mini-speakers that Eminence makes is that the diaphragm is connected directly to the voice coil as opposed to an Aluminum or cardboard 'former' to which the voice coil was connected
flash poll
educational resources
 
follow Planet Analog on Twitter
Planet Analog Twitter Feed
like us on facebook
our partners
Planet Analog
About Us     Contact Us     Help     Register     Twitter     Facebook     RSS