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JAYARAMAN KIRUTHI VASAN
JAYARAMAN KIRUTHI VASAN
6/27/2013 5:23:52 AM
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Master
Re: more detailed case study
@Brad,

Many of us understand documentation on versions of software, hardware, etc. It would be great to know how a team working primarily on analog designs, document their work and keep track of revisions, etc. Blogs on this subject would be very helpful to budding engineers.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/26/2013 2:58:02 PM
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Re: more detailed case study
@JK - you've touched on very important areas there - the need to document things properly or deal with consequnces (which started with Scott's comments regarding the perils of using someone else's design that is not well documentated); and the perils of radiated or picked-up noise, i.e., EMI/EMC.

I'll see if I can write or get more blogs on these topics.

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JAYARAMAN KIRUTHI VASAN
JAYARAMAN KIRUTHI VASAN
6/26/2013 11:28:59 AM
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Master
Re: more detailed case study
"So bandaids are okay for the person who knows why it was added.  But they should be left alone by persons who don't know why it was there."

@Scott,

Aptly said. 

For an EMC problem, we just tried everything - the caps, beads, etc and still the problem wouldn't die. It turned out that the front panel plate where panel sticker was stuck had no connection with mains earth. This was missed by oversight and the penalty paid was almost two weeks.

Band-aid solutions may look simple or sometimes even not so pro, yet , I have seen several Band-aid engineers perfecting the art to provide a lasting solution with great repeatability.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/24/2013 6:47:17 PM
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Re: Re engineering the band aid
@eafpres - kidding aside, I do like some of those silicone sprays or dips - various viscosities for different applications; transparent, mostly. Good stuff for apps like this.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/19/2013 11:13:27 AM
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Re: more detailed case study
That's the problem with "copying" (stealing?) a design - you don't get to see the change orders that were issued that would include the reason why the change was implemented.

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Scott Elder
Scott Elder
6/19/2013 12:58:56 AM
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Re: more detailed case study
I'll post a band-aid solution gone wrong.

Early in my career there was an engineer that reverse engineered the PCB design of a micro computer.  There was this odd capacitor hanging off an address enable line.  Nobody knew why it was there.  Intel didn't advise the use of such a component.  So the wise engineer just dropped it off the BOM.

Well, advance the clock forward a few months and several hundred computers later the field starts reporting wierd anomalies with the computers every now and then.  To shorten the long story, all of the computers had to be brought back to the factory to have that little useless capacitor added back on to the address enable line.

So bandaids are okay for the person who knows why it was added.  But they should be left alone by persons who don't know why it was there.  If you're going to copy someone elses work, you must copy everything.

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DaeJ
DaeJ
6/18/2013 9:57:58 PM
User Rank
Master
Re: Band-aids to final solution
I might overview cost and metal in board (MIB) for final solution. First, design optimization for cost might be concerned related to keeping the same performance as that of original. Cost might be compared between adding passive component and different IC chips requiring less passive component in the power electronic. Second, metal in board might be considered with thermal dissipation plane.  

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analoging
analoging
6/18/2013 8:46:38 PM
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more detailed case study
Can you offer a more detailed case study from your work experience? I am interested in hearing more specifics on a bandaid solution that worked in a company and one that failed. That would enlighten the readership more.

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Brad Albing
Brad Albing
6/18/2013 5:21:00 PM
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Blogger
Re: Re engineering the band aid
You can always just yell to your significant other, "Yo, what time is it?" Of course, that may elicit a response such as, "Time to shut up and get clean." So proceed at your own risk.

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eafpres1
eafpres1
6/18/2013 3:36:59 PM
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Blogger
Re engineering the band aid
Like most engineers I have to look at everything for potential upgrades. For the shower clock I might have tried spraying it with that clear instant bandage stuff you use for large abrasions. Should seal it but still allow opening later. More elegant than plastic wrap. Of course I might have considered just not having a clock in the shower...

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