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Organic and Printed Electronics: A new approach to electronics, Part 2

Organic and Printed Electronics: A new approach to electronics, Part 1 of this blog series describes the new organic and printed electronics technology that is gaining an increasing share in the semiconductor market. As an example, the organic LED cell, built in this new technology, has been introduced.

What could be the application of organic LED displays in some important sectors of the electronics market such as the automotive market or in the mobile phones sector?

A first example is available in a very interesting video showing the potential of this technology (see Figure 1):

Figure 1

Some possible applications of organic printed electronics films (source: YouTube)

Some possible applications of organic printed electronics films (source: YouTube)

The video shows only a few examples of the possible applications of printed organic ICs:

  • The first example is the usage of the organic LED to illuminate storage compartments integrated in a car or on an instrumentation board (see Figure 1 (a)) Moreover the thin flexible and lightweight organic LEDs are perfect for internal illumination of a house, because the usage of organic LEDs having high efficiency could significantly decrease cost.
  • Flexible film solar cells are lightweight and efficient and they can be used to recharge a cell phone or organic solar cells could be integrated in the windows of a smart house to supply the home or building with a renewable energy source by using large area solar cells to provide abundant energy to the buildings (see Figure 1(b)).
  • Another area of interest is wearable, with RFID technology, whose basic idea is to integrate the organic film RFID transponder in a tennis racket, as an example, to monitor the status of the racket structure in wireless mode by integrating an antenna into the structure.

The last example, i.e. the integration of wireless antennas in the package of an object, is a solution that holds promise of becoming a future market with unlimited potential because it allows building smart objects that can communicate wirelessly in a bidirectional mode; thus this technology is perfectly compliant with the development of IOT (Internet of Things) technology, because the objects can be interfaced with a central communication infrastructure to realize a net of smart objects. This trend is confirmed by the contents of the LOPEC 2016, the International Exhibition and conference for the Printed and Electronics Industry:

‘Printing processes are becoming increasingly prevalent in the production of smart electronic components: “With annual growth rates of around 20 percent, printed and organic electronics truly are a market of the future,” points out Dr Klaus Hecker, Managing Director of the OE-A (Organic and Printed Electronics Association), who works together with Messe München to organize LOPEC. “LOPEC represents the entire value chain. It showcases new systems and printing materials as well as printed electronics components which were mere concepts just a few years ago and are now already finding their way into our everyday lives”.’ (Source: oe-a)

The market trend confirms the growing interest regarding the organic and printed electronic technology (see Figure 2):

Figure 2

The OLED plastic and flexible display revenue forecast 2016-2020 
(Source: IDTechEx)

The OLED plastic and flexible display revenue forecast 2016-2020 (Source: IDTechEx)

Do you like organic and flexible electronics technology? Do you think this solution will have a strong impact on the electronics market in the near future? How would you rate the potential of this new technology?

1 comment on “Organic and Printed Electronics: A new approach to electronics, Part 2

  1. vgreer@ieee.org
    June 15, 2016

    We take for granted all of our electronic doodads are little boxes. This technology ultimately will make them fade into the background, disappearing into clothes, walls, floors, etc.

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