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Planet Analog second book give-away for a worthy high school library

Our second Planet Analog tech book give-away begins today. I have three copies of Linear Technology’s First Edition of Analog Circuit Design: A Tutorial Guide to Applications and Solutions

Over the next week I am asking our audience to suggest a worthy high school library anywhere in the US (We can only ship to continental US locations) The deadline will be noon East Coast US time on October 8, one week away.

Tech libraries, especially in high schools, are so critical to those young, budding engineers curious about electronics. This book could not be better for this group as it was written by Bob Dobkin and the late Jim Williams—both Analog “Wizards” with such a gut-feel for electronic design. This type of inate knowledge of electronics is strongly needed for our next generation designers and inventors.

Here is a review by my friend Paul Rako that pretty much says it all.

Please give me and my colleagues some good candidate high schools that would be worthy and convince us why we should award one of these books to them by leaving your choice of high school candidate and comments below.

10 comments on “Planet Analog second book give-away for a worthy high school library

  1. David Ashton
    October 5, 2015

    Steve

    In 2012 I was privileged to be a judge on the LED challenge run by Innovation Generation , EET's STEM site which with the departure of Naomi Price seemed to die a sad death.  Teams were given a basic kit of LEDS and a microcontroller and other bits, and the challenge was to come up with an innovative design using LEDS.  Most of the IG stuff has gone to the big bit bucket in the sky, but this article still remains:

    w w w .eetimes.com/author.asp?section_id=28&doc_id=1285835

    The main prize was won by an all girl team at Oak Canyon Junior High in Lindon, UT.  Their entry was a stylized Christmas tree with the LEDs giving a light show.  They really put a lot of effort into their entry.  I don't know if any of the team are still there now (some of them were quite young so maybe there will be) but they'd be a deserving recipient.

    Innovation Generation did some really good work and it's sad that it has gone.

  2. David Ashton
    October 6, 2015

    John…. Breadboard?  What breadboard?   I must confess to finding a certain attraction in mid-air lash-ups like this, though I will admit your links show some very pretty boards,  I think someone (Max) did a whole article on constuctions like this recently and when done a bit neater they are things of beauty.

  3. Steve Taranovich
    October 6, 2015

    Thanks David—this school is a good candidate. I will ask my colleagues about Innovation Generation. We are all very dedicated to STEM growth.

    I spoke to a NASA astronaut recently on the Orion program and asked him if he was exceited about the manned Mars landing in 2030. He was ecstatic, but said that the NASA astronauts that will be the first to land on Mars are in grammar school right now!

    Our children are our future!

  4. Steve Taranovich
    October 13, 2015

    Our first winner is the entry by David Ashton for the Oak Canyon Junior High in Lindon, UT.

    I will be extending the deadline until next week for this give-away so that the other two books might go to a worthy site as well

  5. David Ashton
    October 13, 2015

    Thanks Steve.  Will you get in touch with them or would you like me to get them to contact you?

  6. Steve Taranovich
    October 13, 2015

    Hi David—I sent an e-mail to the Principal Doug Webb, but if you would like to contact them as well that's fine. I just need a ship address

  7. lorine34
    October 20, 2015

    “Our children are our future!”

    But road to Mars is really long, and 2030 seems to be seems a little short.

  8. Steve Taranovich
    October 20, 2015

    @lorine34—NASA's official statement is the 2030's

  9. EdwardThirlwall
    September 3, 2018

    Thanks for donating those useful sources of knowledge and info to the worthy institutions. It is better to give them away to a bigger group as opposed to individuals. This way, the subject matter can be studied by more interested parties and get the sharing going. 

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