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Precision Control & High Resolution

In advance of our chat session on Wednesday, Nov, 19, at 1:00 p.m. EST (10:00 a.m. PST), here is our second tutorial tech basic blog. A final one will post on Nov. 17 in order to stimulate your questions for our chat.

(Image: Texas Instruments)

(Image: Texas Instruments)

(Image: Texas Instruments)

(Image: Texas Instruments)

Direct Digital Control of a DC-DC Converter

(Image: Texas Instruments)

(Image: Texas Instruments)

“z” versus “s”

(Image: Texas Instruments)

(Image: Texas Instruments)

(Image: Texas Instruments)

(Image: Texas Instruments)

Digital Voltage Mode Controller

(Image: Texas Instruments)

(Image: Texas Instruments)

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5 comments on “Precision Control & High Resolution

  1. Myled
    November 18, 2014

    Steve, too much complicated with equations. Circuit is fine and able to follow. 

  2. Steve Taranovich
    November 18, 2014

    @Myanalog—You are right—I know that you understand them, but they might not be for the wider audience—the equations are really complex, but not necessary for a power designer to use Digital Power in their design—I hope I don't scare away Power designers. This is just an example of Digital Power analysis, but the actual usage of Digital Power is greatly simplified with friendly GUIs and no mathematics necessary.

    The equations are for the engineering geeks who want to delve deeply into Digital Power and how it works.

  3. etnapowers
    November 19, 2014

    It's very important for a digital power designer the allocation of the poles/zeros of the control transfer function. The precision of the approximation utilized from “s” complex variable to “z” is important as well to ensure the correct working of the overall circuitry.

  4. Myled
    November 20, 2014

    “I know that you understand them, but they might not be for the wider audience—the equations are really complex, but not necessary for a power designer to use Digital Power in their design—I hope I don't scare away Power designers. This is just an example of Digital Power analysis, but the actual usage of Digital Power is greatly simplified with friendly GUIs and no mathematics necessary. The equations are for the engineering geeks who want to delve deeply into Digital Power and how it works.”

    Steve, thanks and we know that. Appreciating the efforts you have taken to derive it.

  5. geek
    November 25, 2014

    “The equations are for the engineering geeks who want to delve deeply into Digital Power and how it works.”

    @Steve: To me the equations actually complement the circuit rather than complicating it. I think they give out a better understanding of the circuit. But you're right about the fact that they may appeal to geeks more than normal readers.

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