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Smart sun exposure: A non-invasive wearable electronics solution to preserve our health, Part 2

In Smart sun exposure: A non-invasive wearable electronics solution to preserve our health, Part 1, I have described how the electronics technology could effectively help fair skinned people to monitor the level of ultraviolet radiation absorbed by their skin during outdoor summer activities like swimming or beach sport activities. Ultraviolet rays are not always dangerous, they are useful to the human body to produce vitamin D, however it is very important to avoid excess of exposure because many dangerous diseases might occur; for example, the human eye in case of excessive exposition time to the UVs:

“To investigate the relation of ultraviolet radiation and cataract formation, we undertook an epidemiologic survey of 838 watermen (mean age, 53 years) who worked on Chesapeake Bay. The annual ocular exposure was calculated from the age of 16 for each waterman by combining a detailed occupational history with laboratory and field measurements of sun exposure. Cataracts were graded by ophthalmologic examination for both type and severity. Some degree of cortical cataract was found in 111 of the watermen (13 percent), and some degree of nuclear cataract in 229 (27 percent). Logistic regression analysis showed that high cumulative levels of ultraviolet B exposure significantly increased the risk of cortical cataract (regression coefficient, 0.70; P = 0.04). A doubling of cumulative exposure increased the risk of cortical cataract by a factor of 1.60 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.01 to 2.64). Those whose annual average exposure was in the upper quartile had a risk increased by 3.30 (confidence interval, 0.90 to 9.97) as compared with those in the lowest quartile. Analysis using a serially additive expected-dose model showed that watermen with cortical lens opacities had a 21 percent higher average annual exposure to ultraviolet B (t-test, 2.23; P = 0.03).” (Source: NCBI)

How could an electronics object, preferably wearable, make it possible to monitor the quantity of UV radiation that is radiating on the skin of a person exposed to sunlight?

A wristband wearable gadget might be very useful in this application (see Figure 1):

“…the UVeBand isn’t simply a timer – it actually keeps track of the intensity of UVA and UVB rays, so its alert time will be recalculated if the sun goes behind the clouds, or if you move to a shadier area.

The device itself is a silicone-coated water-resistant band, that the user simply slaps onto their wrist. The band’s capacitive switching technology turns the device on upon contact with the skin – it also turns the band off again (and resets it) when it’s removed.

Once activated, the UVeBand’s integrated UV sensor measures incoming ultraviolet radiation via a small window, once every three seconds. An onboard processor keeps track of the cumulative exposure” (Source: gizmag)

Figure 1

The UVeBand wearable device. (Source: For a larger image and complete article click here → gizmag.com)

The UVeBand wearable device. (Source: For a larger image and complete article click here → gizmag.com)

The UV sensor is a very important part of the UVeBand , an interesting example of this type of integrated sensor, silicon based, is represented by the UVIS25 sensor, made by the STMicroelectronics Company, which has been developed with a dedicated technology to achieve high accuracy for UV index measurements. Moreover the sensor has been tested with a special check test setup (see Figure 2):

“The UVIS25 is a digital UV index sensor able to provide an accurate measurement of the ultraviolet radiation index (UVI) from sunlight. It includes a sensing element and a mixed signal ASIC to provide the UV index data through I2C and SPI interfaces. A dedicated technology has been developed to achieve the greatest accuracy for UV index measurements.

While, if the test is additionally performed under an artificial source, it is strictly recommended to use an UV broadband stimulus from 280 nm – 400 nm, such us Newport Oriel® Sol3A™ Solar Simulator” (Source: STMicroelectronics)

Figure 2

The block diagram and the check test setup of the UIVS25 sensor made by STMicroelectronics Company (Source: www.st.com)

The block diagram and the check test setup of the UIVS25 sensor made by STMicroelectronics Company (Source: www.st.com)

Do you like this application using electronics technology in the creation of high accuracy UV sensors? Do you think that this approach will effectively make it easy to avoid the negative effects of the UV rays and this strategy will allow the prevention of many dangerous diseases of the human skin? Do you think smart electronics’ objects might effectively guarantee the user to have many sunny, healthy and safer summer holidays?

1 comment on “Smart sun exposure: A non-invasive wearable electronics solution to preserve our health, Part 2

  1. nadine12
    August 8, 2016

    the findings in the field of health are increasingly numerous and increasingly amazing

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