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Smart water control: A strategy based on IOT technology to preserve oceans and sea environments, Part 2

In Smart water control: A strategy based on IOT technology to preserve oceans and sea environments, Part 1 of this blog series, the “Venus Swarm” project has been introduced as a promising application for IOT technology to preserve marine environments by monitoring some parameters of interest, such as the level of the sea in the Venice lagoon. One of the main goals of this type of project is to inform the population living in that beautiful area about the conditions of the sea spot, on a real time basis.

Furthermore this concept may be stressed to realize the capability to alert, in real time, the population of a town situated on the coast in case of a dangerous situation like the so-called tsunami phenomenon (see Figure 1)

Figure 1

The 3D simulation of a tsunami (Source wikipedia)

The 3D simulation of a tsunami (Source wikipedia)

How is it possible to realize an effective control through the robot fish of the Venice swarm? The robot fish of the swarm may be equipped with integrated sensors, silicon based, to monitor real time the conditions of the sea near the coasts. The perfect sensor for this type of application is an accelerometer capable of measuring the acceleration on three axis directions (see Figure 2)

Figure 2

The IC MEMS (Source: mCube)

The IC MEMS (Source: mCube)

The robot fish communicate with each other by utilizing integrated wireless modules that create a net of distributed wireless sensors able to communicate with a central hub. This hub sends the water environment data, elaborated and stored in a surveillance control center that might effectively alert the population living in the marine area, about the status of the sea. In this way the authorities can organize accordingly preventive actions to protect the population from the catastrophic consequences of an earthquake generated in the depth of the oceans which can create dangerous high waves on the nearest coasts. In the case of these dangerous situations, the effectiveness of the monitoring is deeply correlated to the timing of the alert messages. An early alarm sent from the robot fish to a central hub of a rescue center may represent the difference between life and death in an emergency situation. The robots could act as moving sensors of a distributed Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) network (see Figure 3)

Figure 3

A submarine WSN network (Source International Journal of Computer Theory and Engineering)

The communication between the robot fish could be realized by a wi-fi module, silicon based, and this implementation may be favored by the growing diffusion of this IC’s wireless communication modules. Indeed the wi-fi semiconductor market is expected to grow up to $12B in 2020, as reported in a report from Solid State Technology.

The wi-fi communication submarine nets are a well working solution to avoid the usage of cables in those types of environments that require to be monitored. This solution has been developed by The WFS technology company that realizes communication solutions for example for the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry:

Oil and Gas industry. Many offshore projects require reliable underwater communications, where failure in the communications system can lead to costly maintenance, delays, production downtime, or environmental disaster. Utilizing Seatooth® technology, WFS’s products support wireless data communications and networking with divers, ROVs and AUVs and subsea and buried sensors and actuators .” (source: WFS)

It might be required to store a big quantity of data to accomplish this smart control of the sea coasts for high risk tsunami areas. Each day great amounts of data has to be collected at a specified time rate by each fish robot in different moments of the daytime, with many fish that swim in different areas of the sea. This monitoring activity requires a high capability for storing memory, which would be preferably integrated in the robot itself. This functionality might be implemented by utilizing the high capability integrated super memory that has been introduced in part one of this blog series (see Figure 4).

Figure 4

The superman memory crystal. (Source : Optoelectronics Research Centre University of Southampton)

The superman memory crystal. (Source : Optoelectronics Research Centre University of Southampton)

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