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Using Spice to Design the PID Control for a TEC Temperature Loop

Even though we publish new blogs daily from your intrepid editor and from a number of well known writers, sometimes it's good to have a look back at some of our articles from the recent past that got good responses.

Here is one that ties in with my recent blog that discussed servo systems, Servo Seems Absent in Automotive HVAC.

The article was written by Matthew William Hann of Texas Instruments. Hann discusses the use of Spice to evaluate the performance of the control loop used to regulate the temperature of a thermo-electric cooler.

Related post:

10 comments on “Using Spice to Design the PID Control for a TEC Temperature Loop

  1. amrutah
    June 29, 2013

    Spice is a accurate tool for simulation of electronic circuits.  When it comes to simulating the PID controlled circuits, one has to be very good at macromodelling.  The breaking of the inner and outer loop and the accuracy of the models are challenging.

      Also when it comes to automotive, do we really care for accurate temperature control, say 0.1 deg accuracy.

  2. Vishal Prajapati
    June 29, 2013

    Now a days lot of cars are coming with zone wise temperature control. That type of application might use the accurate control. Or I think so.

  3. Netcrawl
    June 29, 2013

    @amrutah you're right, SPICE is awesome it s give us the ability to simulate components ranging from the most basic passive elements to a much sophisticated semiconductor devices such as MESFETs and MOSFETs. its really a great tool, able us to simulate the behavior of an actual electronic devices- enable us to design effectively and make some right decision.

  4. David Maciel Silva
    June 30, 2013

    The Advancement of simulators, gives us greater assurance in development allowing the project contains no errors, or that they are very close to the desired.

    What type of simulator, our followers are accustomed to using? What level of reliability of them?

  5. SunitaT
    June 30, 2013

     sometimes it's good to have a look back at some of our articles from the recent past that got good responses.


    @Brad, thanks for the post. I agree with you that its good to review the past blogs which got good responses. I think we can learn a lot from those discussions and may be we can add new perspective to that discussion. 

  6. SunitaT
    June 30, 2013

    Also when it comes to automotive, do we really care for accurate temperature control, say 0.1 deg accuracy.


    @amrutah, I dont think we need such high accuracy when we are dealing with automotive design. I think such accuracy is only needed in space and some military applications.

  7. Brad Albing
    June 30, 2013

    I expect that's used in the higher-end (i.e., more expensive trim-line) cars. Tho' even then, I wonder if a full PID controller (meaning all 3 terms) is used.

  8. Brad Albing
    June 30, 2013

    @amrutah >>Also when it comes to automotive, do we really care for accurate temperature control, say 0.1 deg accuracy. Exactly so. Don't need it that good in the passenger car cabin, tho' for a TEC, entirely likely.

  9. Vishal Prajapati
    July 1, 2013

    Probably it is not practical to use PID for A/C control. So…

  10. dates
    July 2, 2013

    The purpose of PID control is not only to increases the steady-state accuracy, but also to improve the speed of response and damping, regarding how fast it gets there.

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